Jonah 4

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1 Dit verdroot Jona met groot verdriet, en zijn toorn ontstak.

2 En hij bad tot den HEERE, en zeide: Och HEERE! was dit mijn woord niet, als ik nog in mijn land was? Daarom kwam ik het voor, vluchtende naar Tarsis; want ik wist, dat Gij een genadig en barmhartig God zijt, lankmoedig en groot van goedertierenheid, en berouw hebbende over het kwaad.

3 Nu dan, HEERE! neem toch mijn ziel van mij; want het is mij beter te sterven dan te leven.

4 En de HEERE zeide: Is uw toorn billijk ontstoken?

5 Jona nu ging ter stad uit, en zette zich tegen het oosten der stad; en hij maakte zich aldaar een verdek, en zat daaronder in de schaduw, totdat hij zag, wat van de stad zou worden.

6 En God, de HEERE, beschikte een wonderboom, en deed hem opschieten boven Jona, opdat er schaduw mocht zijn over zijn hoofd, om hem te redden van zijn verdriet. En Jona verblijdde zich over den wonderboom met grote blijdschap.

7 Maar God beschikte een worm des anderen daags in het opgaan van den dageraad; die stak den wonderboom, dat hij verdorde.

8 En het geschiedde, als de zon oprees, dat God een stillen oostenwind beschikte; en de zon stak op het hoofd van Jona, dat hij amechtig werd; en hij wenste zijner ziel te mogen sterven, en zeide: Het is mij beter te sterven dan te leven.

9 Toen zeide God tot Jona: Is uw toorn billijk ontstoken over den wonderboom? En hij zeide: Billijk is mijn toorn ontstoken ter dood toe.

10 En de HEERE zeide: Gij verschoont den wonderboom, aan welken gij niet hebt gearbeid, noch dien groot gemaakt; die in een nacht werd, en in een nacht verging;

11 En Ik zou die grote stad Nineve niet verschonen? waarin veel meer dan honderd en twintig duizend mensen zijn, die geen onderscheid weten tussen hun rechterhand, en hun linkerhand; daartoe veel vee?


Exploring the Meaning of Jonah 4      

Napsal(a) New Christian Bible Study Staff

In this fourth chapter of the Book of Jonah, (Jonah 4), the prophet Jonah has a strange reaction to his success. He's angry, and sulky. He thinks he knows better than God does. What is this story about?

Rev. George McCurdy, in his exegesis of this chapter, offers a summary in his Study Guide for the Book of Jonah, which is available for free as a .pdf, for your use. Below, we've excerpted part of his summary, and edited it for use in this context.

The people of the Jewish church in Jonah's time didn't want to reconsider their belief in their "most-favored-nation status." They challenged the Lord. They couldn't understand why He wanted to save their enemies in Nineveh.

Despite the hard lessons in chapters 1 and 2, and his success as described in chapter 3, Jonah still thought he knew better than the Lord. He thought that God was being too soft and loving -- too forgiving -- and that He needed to come around to Jonah’s tougher view.

Jonah got so angry and vengeful that he preferred to die rather than approve of the Lord’s way to save the Ninevites. His self-love wanted shade -- protection for its concepts. The Lord needed to bring such thinking to an end; the worm brought about death to the gourd from within. The Lord then sent a vehement east wind, that represents a blowing away of the stagnant thinking of the church.

The Lord's heavenly sun shone upon Jonah, but he felt faint. Here, Jonah's insistence on his own troubling view of things made him uncomfortable with the Lord’s view. The Divine guidance offered him a way to learn to enjoy the success of his neighbors as his own, but he wouldn't take it.

For us, then -- what? This story is telling us that we can't just keep the truths of the Word for ourselves; we have to go to Nineveh and share them. And then, if people start to hear them, and use them to turn their lives around, we can't allow ourselves to get resentful that the Lord accepts their repentance and forgives them. It's a very human reaction; think of the disciples vying to be first in the Lord's command structure (Luke 9:46), or the brother of the prodigal son (Luke 15:28-29), or the workers in the vineyard who had worked all day for a denarius (Matthew 20:10-12). But... it's not a good reaction. The Lord doesn't admire it in Jonah, and doesn't admire it when it crops up in our minds, either.

Rev. Martin Pennington recommends several explanatory passages from Swedenborg's theological writings:

"Shade or shadow means the perception of good and truth lies in obscurity." (Arcana Coelestia 2367)

"A vine is spiritual good (the spiritual church)". (Arcana Coelestia 217)

"A worm represents falsity gnawing away and tormenting one." (Arcana Coelestia 8481)

"'And the sun grew hot' in the contrary sense means self-love and love of the world." (Arcana Coelestia 8487)

And... here's a link to an interesting (audio) sermon on this chapter, by Rev. Todd Beiswenger.

   Studovat vnitřní smysl

Exploring the Meaning of Jonah 4      

Napsal(a) New Christian Bible Study Staff

In this fourth chapter of the Book of Jonah, (Jonah 4), the prophet Jonah has a strange reaction to his success. He's angry, and sulky. He thinks he knows better than God does. What is this story about?

Rev. George McCurdy, in his exegesis of this chapter, offers a summary in his Study Guide for the Book of Jonah, which is available for free as a .pdf, for your use. Below, we've excerpted part of his summary, and edited it for use in this context.

The people of the Jewish church in Jonah's time didn't want to reconsider their belief in their "most-favored-nation status." They challenged the Lord. They couldn't understand why He wanted to save their enemies in Nineveh.

Despite the hard lessons in chapters 1 and 2, and his success as described in chapter 3, Jonah still thought he knew better than the Lord. He thought that God was being too soft and loving -- too forgiving -- and that He needed to come around to Jonah’s tougher view.

Jonah got so angry and vengeful that he preferred to die rather than approve of the Lord’s way to save the Ninevites. His self-love wanted shade -- protection for its concepts. The Lord needed to bring such thinking to an end; the worm brought about death to the gourd from within. The Lord then sent a vehement east wind, that represents a blowing away of the stagnant thinking of the church.

The Lord's heavenly sun shone upon Jonah, but he felt faint. Here, Jonah's insistence on his own troubling view of things made him uncomfortable with the Lord’s view. The Divine guidance offered him a way to learn to enjoy the success of his neighbors as his own, but he wouldn't take it.

For us, then -- what? This story is telling us that we can't just keep the truths of the Word for ourselves; we have to go to Nineveh and share them. And then, if people start to hear them, and use them to turn their lives around, we can't allow ourselves to get resentful that the Lord accepts their repentance and forgives them. It's a very human reaction; think of the disciples vying to be first in the Lord's command structure (Luke 9:46), or the brother of the prodigal son (Luke 15:28-29), or the workers in the vineyard who had worked all day for a denarius (Matthew 20:10-12). But... it's not a good reaction. The Lord doesn't admire it in Jonah, and doesn't admire it when it crops up in our minds, either.

Rev. Martin Pennington recommends several explanatory passages from Swedenborg's theological writings:

"Shade or shadow means the perception of good and truth lies in obscurity." (Arcana Coelestia 2367)

"A vine is spiritual good (the spiritual church)". (Arcana Coelestia 217)

"A worm represents falsity gnawing away and tormenting one." (Arcana Coelestia 8481)

"'And the sun grew hot' in the contrary sense means self-love and love of the world." (Arcana Coelestia 8487)

And... here's a link to an interesting (audio) sermon on this chapter, by Rev. Todd Beiswenger.

Swedenborg

Hlavní výklad ze Swedenborgových prací:

The Inner Meaning of the Prophets and Psalms 214


Další odkazy Swedenborga k této kapitole:

Arcana Coelestia 10441

Leer over de Gewijde Schrift 51

Ware Christelijke Religie 226


Odkazy ze Swedenborgových nevydaných prací:

Apocalypse Explained 401, 419

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Skočit na podobné biblické verše

Genesis 4:6, 41:6

I Koningen 19:4, 21:4

Job 7:2, 15, 16

Psalm 86:15, 145:9

Prediker 7:9

Hosea 13:15

Jonah 1:2, 3:9

Mattheüs 2:10, 20:15

Lucas 15:28

Významy biblických slov

Jona
'Jonah' represents the Jewish nation.

heere
The Lord, in the simplest terms, is love itself expressed as wisdom itself. In philosophic terms, love is the Lord's substance and wisdom is His...

zeide
As with many common verbs, the meaning of “to say” in the Bible is highly dependent on context. Who is speaking? Who is hearing? What...

woord
'Word,' as in Psalms 119:6-17, stands for doctrine in general. 'The Word,' as in Psalms 147:18, signifies divine good united with divine truth. 'Word,' as...

vluchtende
Flight, as in Matthew 14:20, signifies removal from a state of the good of love and innocence. Flight, as in Mark 8:18, signifies the last...

wist
Like so many common verbs, the meaning of "know" in the Bible is varied and dependent on context. And in some cases – when it...

barmhartig
In regular language, "mercy" means being caring and compassionate toward those who are in poor states. That's a position we are all in relative to...

kwaad
'To hurt,' as mentioned in Revelation 6:6, signifies violation and profanation. 'To hurt' as mentioned in Revelation 9:4, signifies perverting the truths and goods of...

ziel
The nature of the soul is a deep and complicated topic, but it can be summarized as "spiritual life," who we are in terms of...

leven
'Lives' is used in the plural, because of the will and understanding, and because these two lives make one.

stad
In the ancient world cities were very nearly nations unto themselves – they existed within walls, with their own laws and customs, generally centered on...

schaduw
'The shadow is good' of the oak, poplar and elm means complacence.

zag
To look,' as in Genesis 18:22, signifies thinking, because seeing denotes understanding. Look not back behind thee,' as in Genesis 19:17, means that Lot, who...

god
De Heer is de liefde zelf, uitgedrukt in de vorm van de wijsheid zelf. Liefde is dan ook zijn essentie, zijn in wezen. Wijsheid -...

hoofd
The head is the part of us that is highest, which means in a representative sense that it is what is closest to the Lord....

worm
'A worm' denotes falsity of evil in the good derived from the proprium or selfhood. 'That dies not,' denotes infernal torment related to falsity. 'Worm'...

zon
The 'sun' signifies celestial and spiritual love. The 'sun' in the Word, when referring to the Lord, signifies His divine love and wisdom. Because the...

Nineve
'Nineveh' signifies the falsities of doctrinal matters, also the Gentiles, or the falsities originating in the fallacies of the senses, in the obscurity of an...

veel
Intellectual things – ideas, knowledge, facts, even insight and understanding – are more separate and free-standing than emotional things, and it’s easier to imagine numbering...

honderd
It's a landmark for a young child to count to 100; it sort of covers all the "ordinary" numbers. One hundred is obviously significant for...

twintig
'Twenty,' when referring to a quantity, signifies everything, or fullness, because it is ten twice. In Genesis 18:31, 'twenty', like all numbers occurring in the...

duizend
As children, most of us at some point frustrated our mothers into using the phrase “if I've told you once, I've told you a thousand...

weten
Like so many common verbs, the meaning of "know" in the Bible is varied and dependent on context. And in some cases – when it...

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