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Apocalypse Explained #979

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979. Yea, O Lord God Almighty, true and just are Thy judgments, signifies that these things are done because all things have their essence, life and power from the Divine good and the Divine truth. This is evident from the signification of "Lord God," as being the Lord as to the Divine good and the Divine truth; for the Lord is called "Lord" from the Divine good, and "God" from the Divine truth. Also from the signification of "Almighty," as being to be, to live, and to have power from Himself (See n. 43, 689, 939); so also that He is being, life, and power to all things; for the Lord is all this from Himself, but man is all this from the Lord. Also from the signification of "Thy judgments," as being those things that are being done, namely, those mentioned above in the sixth verse. That this is what is meant by "judgments" is evident from the fifth verse, where it is said, "Just art Thou, O Lord, and holy, because Thou hast judged these things." These judgments are called "true" from the Divine truth, and "just" from the Divine good, from which two all things are effected. (That "just" is predicated of the Divine good may be seen above, n. 972.) The same things are involved in these words, "Yea, O Lord God Almighty, true and just are Thy judgments," as in the words of the fifth verse, "Thou art just, O Lord, who art and who wast, and art holy, because Thou hast judged these things." The only difference is that the latter were said from the Lord's spiritual kingdom, and the former from His celestial kingdom. "Yea" is here an expression confirmative of the statements from the spiritual kingdom. That the same things are involved see above (n. 972-974), and compare.

(Continuation respecting the Fifth Commandment)

[2] From what has been said above, what is meant in the Word by good works can now be seen, namely, that they are all works done by man when evils have been removed as sins. For the works done after this are done from man only as if from him; for they are done from the Lord, and all works done from the Lord are good, and are called the goods of life, the goods of charity, and good works; as for instance, all the judgments of a judge who has justice as his end, and who venerates and loves it as Divine, and who detests as infamous decisions made for the sake of rewards or friendship, or from favor. Thus he consults the good of his country by causing justice and judgment to reign therein as in heaven; and thus he consults the peace of every innocent citizen and protects him from the violence of evildoers. All these are good works. So all services of managers and dealings of merchants are good works when they shun unlawful gains as sins against the Divine laws. When a man shuns evils as sins he daily learns what a good work is, and the affection of doing good grows with him, and the affection of knowing truths for the sake of good; for so far as he knows truths he can perform works more fully and more wisely, and thus his works become more truly good. Cease, therefore, from asking in thyself, "What are the good works that I must do, or what good must I do to receive eternal life?" Only cease from evils as sins and look to the Lord, and the Lord will teach and lead you.

  
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Apocalypse Explained #972

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972. Just art thou, O Lord who art and who wast, signifies the Lord as to the Divine good from eternity. This is evident from the signification of "just," as being in relation to the Lord the Divine good, for "just" is predicated in the Word of good, and "holy" of truth (See above, n. 204); also from the signification of "who art and who wast," as being the infinite and the eternal, for "art and wast" means the same as "Jehovah," and the Lord is called Jehovah in the Word from the Divine good, and God from the Divine truth; moreover, to be [esse] in reference to the Lord means to be from Himself, that is, in Himself, and to exist [existere] means in reference to the Lord to exist from Himself and in Himself. And in a relative sense to exist [existere] is to be [esse] in all things of heaven and the church; and this is effected by the Divine truth. This to be [esse] is what is meant by the eternal; for in heaven (otherwise than in the world) eternal, as applied to the Lord is without any idea of time; for in the angelic idea eternal means a state of the Divine existence, which nevertheless makes one with the Divine essence, which is Jehovah. The infinite in relation to being [esse] is signified by "who art" in Jehovah; and the infinite in relation to existence [existere] is signified by "who was" in Jehovah. The infinite existence [existere], which is also the eternal, is the Divine proceeding, from which is heaven and everything of it. The Divine existence [existere] is also the Divine being [esse] but it is called existence [existere] in relation to heaven, where it is the all in all.

(Continuation respecting the Fifth Commandment)

[2] He who refrains from thefts, understood in a broad sense, and even shuns them from any other cause than religion and for the sake of eternal life, is not cleansed of them; for in no other way can he open heaven. For it is through heaven that the Lord removes evils with man, as through heaven He removes the hells. For example, there are higher and lower managers of property, merchants, judges, officers of every kind, and workmen, who refrain from thefts, that is, from unlawful modes of gain and usury, and who shun these, but only to secure reputation and thus honor or gain, because of civil and moral laws, in a word, from some natural love or natural fear, thus from merely external constraints, and not from religion; but the interiors of such are full of thefts and robberies, and these burst forth when external constraints are removed from them, as takes place with everyone after death. Their sincerity and rectitude is nothing but a mask, a disguise, and a deceit.

  
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Apocalypse Explained #204

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204. These things saith He that is Holy, He that is True, signifies from whom is that faith. This is evident from the signification of "He that is Holy, He that is True," as being, in reference to the Lord, He from whom are charity and faith. He is called "holy" because charity is from Him, and "true" because faith is from Him. That the Lord is called "holy" because charity is from Him, and consequently that "holy" in the Word is predicated of charity and of faith therefrom will be seen presently. But the Lord is called "true" because faith is from Him, and consequently "true" in the Word is predicated of faith, for the reason that all truth is of faith; for that is called "true" which is believed; other things are not of faith because they are not believed. But because the faith of charity is here treated of, something shall first be said about faith and what it is.

[2] There is spiritual faith, and there is faith merely natural. Spiritual faith is wholly from charity, and in its essence is charity. Charity, or love towards the neighbor, is to love truth, sincerity, and what is just, and to do them from willing them. For the neighbor in the spiritual sense is not every man, but it is that which is with man; if this be truth, sincerity, and what is just, and the man is loved on account of these, then the neighbor is loved. That this is what charity means, in the spiritual sense, anyone may know if he will but reflect. Everyone loves another, not for the sake of his person, but for the sake of what is with him; this is the ground of all friendship, all favor, and all honor. From this it follows, that to love men for the sake of what is true, sincere, and just in them is spiritual love; for what is true, sincere, and just are spiritual things, because they are out of heaven from the Lord. For no man thinks, wills, and does any good thing that is good in itself, but it is all from the Lord; and what is true, sincere, and just are good things that are good in themselves when they are from the Lord. These things, then, are the neighbor in the spiritual sense; from which it is clear what is meant in that sense by loving the neighbor, or by charity. From that is spiritual faith; for whatever is loved is called truth when it is thought. Everyone can see that this is so if he will reflect upon it, for everyone confirms that which he loves by many things in the thought, and all things by which he confirms himself he calls truths; no one has truth from any other source. From this it follows, that the truths a man has are such as is the love with him; consequently, if the love with him is spiritual, the truths will also be spiritual, since the truths act as one with his love. All truths, because they are believed, are called in one complex, faith. From this it is clear that spiritual faith in its essence is charity. So far concerning spiritual faith.

[3] But faith merely natural is not a faith of the church, although it is called faith, but is merely knowing [scientia]. It is not a faith of the church, because it does not proceed from love to the neighbor, or charity, which is the spiritual itself from which faith comes, but proceeds from some natural love that has reference either to love of self or to love of the world, and whatever proceeds from these loves is natural. Love forms the spirit of man; for man in respect to his spirit is wholly as his love is; from that he thinks, from that he wills, and from that acts; therefore he makes no other truth to be of his faith than that which is of his love; and truth that is of the love of self or the world is merely natural, because it comes from man and from the world, and not from the Lord and from heaven; for such a man loves truth, not from a love of truth but from a love of honor, of gain and of fame, which he serves; and as his truth is such, his faith also is such. This faith, therefore, is not a faith of the truth of the church, or faith in a spiritual sense, but only in a natural sense which is a mere knowing [scientia]. And again because nothing of this is in man's spirit but only in his memory, together with other things of this world, therefore also after death it is dissipated. For only that which is of man's love remains with him after death, for (as has been said) it is love that forms man's spirit, and man in respect to his spirit is wholly such as his love is. (Other things respecting charity and faith therefrom may be seen in The Doctrine of the New Jerusalem, where charity and faith are treated of, n. 84-106, 108-122; also in the small work on The Last Judgment, where it is shown that there is no faith where there is not charity, n. 33-39)

[4] That "holy" in the Word is predicated of Divine truth, and therefore of charity and its faith, is evident from the passages where it is spoken of. There are two things that proceed from the Lord and are received by angels, Divine good and Divine truth. These two proceed united from the Lord, but they are received by angels variously; some receive Divine good more that Divine truth, and some receive Divine truth more than Divine good. Those who receive Divine good more than Divine truth constitute the Lord's celestial kingdom and are called celestial angels, and in the Word are called "the righteous" [or "just"]; but those who receive Divine truth more than Divine good constitute the Lord's spiritual kingdom, and are called spiritual angels, and in the Word "holy" [or "saints"]. (Of these two kingdoms and their angels, see in the work on Heaven and Hell 20-28.) From this it is that "the righteous" [or "just"] and "righteousness" [or "justice"] in the Word mean the Divine good and what proceeds therefrom, and that "the holy" and "holiness" mean Divine truth and what proceeds therefrom. From this can be seen what is meant in the Word by "being justified" [or "made righteous"], and "being made holy." As in Revelation:

He that is righteous let him be made righteous still, and he that is holy let him be made holy still (Revelation 22:11).

And in Luke:

To serve Him in holiness and righteousness (Luke 1:74-75

[5] Since Divine truth proceeding from the Lord is meant by "holy," therefore the Lord is called in the Word "the Holy One," " the Holy One of God," "the Holy One of Israel," "the Holy One of Jacob;" and it is also from this that angels are called "holy," and also the prophets and apostles; and it is from this that Jerusalem is called "holy." That the Lord is called "the Holy One," "the Holy One of God," "the Holy One of Israel," and "the Holy One of Jacob," may be seen inIsaiah 29:23; 31:1; 40:25; 41:14, 16; 43:3; 49:7; Daniel 4:13; 9:24; Mark 1:24; Luke 4:34. He is also called "King of the holy ones [of saints]" in Revelation:

Righteous [or just] and true are Thy ways, Thou King of saints (Revelation 15:3).

The Lord is called "the Holy One," "the Holy One of God," "the Holy One of Israel," and "the Holy One of Jacob" because He alone, and no one else, is holy, which is also declared in Revelation:

Who shall not fear Thee, O Lord and glorify Thy name? for Thou only art holy (Revelation 15:4).

[6] Angels, prophets, and apostles are called "holy" because by them, in the spiritual sense, is meant Divine truth; and Jerusalem is called "the holy city," because by that city, in the spiritual sense, is meant the church in respect to the doctrine of truth. That angels in the Word are called "holy," see Matthew 25:31; Mark 8:38; Luke 9:26; the prophets, Mark 6:20; Luke 1:70; Revelation 18:20; the apostles, Revelation 18:20; that Jerusalem is called "the holy city," Isaiah 48:2; 66:20, 22; Daniel 9:24; Matthew 27:53; Revelation 21:2, 10. (That by "angels" in the Word Divine truth proceeding from the Lord is meant, see above, n. 130, 200; the like by "prophets," see Arcana Coelestia 2534, 7269; likewise by "apostles," see above, n. 100; that by "Jerusalem" in the Word the church in respect to the doctrine of truth is meant, see The Doctrine of the New Jerusalem 6.) From this it can be seen why it is that Divine truth proceeding from the Lord is called "the Spirit of truth," and "the Holy Spirit" (See above, n. 183), so also why heaven is called the "habitation of holiness" (Isaiah 63:15; Deuteronomy 26:15); and why the church is called "the sanctuary" (Jeremiah 17:12; Lamentations 2:7; Psalms 68:35).

[7] That "holiness" is predicated of Divine truth is evident from the following passages. In John:

Jesus when praying said, Father, sanctify them [make them Holy] in Thy truth, Thy Word is truth, and for their sakes I sanctify Myself, that they also may be sanctified in the truth (John 17:17, 19).

Here "being made holy" is plainly said in respect to truth, and "those made holy" in respect to those who receive Divine truth from the Lord. In Moses:

Jehovah came from Sinai, out of the myriads of holiness; from His right hand the fire of the law unto them; even He who loveth the peoples; in Thy hand are all His saints, and they are prostrated at Thy foot; he shall receive of Thy words (Deuteronomy 33:2-3).

"Sinai" signifies heaven where the Lord is, from whom is Divine truth, or from whom is the "law," both in a strict and in a broad sense; "myriads of holiness" signifies Divine truths; "the law" signifies, in a strict sense, the ten commandments of the Decalogue, and in a broad sense, the whole Word, which is Divine truth; those are called "peoples" in the Word who are in truths, and those of them that are in truths are called "saints." "Being prostrated at Thy foot," and "receiving of Thy words," is the holy reception of Divine truth in ultimates, which is the Word in the sense of the letter, and being instructed therefrom. From this it can be known what the particulars in that prophecy signify in the spiritual sense. (That "Sinai" in the Word signifies heaven where the Lord is, from whom is Divine truth, or from whom is the law, both in a strict and a broad sense, see Arcana Coelestia n. 8399, 8753, 8793, 8805, 9420. That "the law" signifies, in a strict sense, the ten commandments of the Decalogue, and in a broad sense, the whole Word, n. 2606, 3382, 6752, 7463. That those are called "peoples" who are in truths, and "nations" who are in goods, n. 1259, 1260, 2928, 3295, 3581, 6451, 6465, 7207, 10288. That "foot," a "place of feet," and "footstool," signify, in reference to the Lord, Divine truth in ultimates, thus the Word in the letter, n. 9406[1-7].) From this it is clear that "myriads of holiness" are Divine truths, and that those here called "holy [saints]" are those who are in Divine truths.

[8] In Moses:

Speak unto all the congregation of the sons of Israel, and say unto them, Ye shall be holy, for I Jehovah [God] of Israel am holy (Leviticus 19:2).

This chapter treats of the statutes, judgments, and precepts which they were to keep; and as these signify Divine truths, it is said that those who keep them "shall be holy." Moreover, "Israel" signifies the spiritual church, which is the church that is in Divine truths, therefore it is said, "I Jehovah [God] of Israel am holy." In the same:

Ye shall sanctify yourselves, and ye shall be holy. And ye shall keep My statutes that ye may do them (Leviticus 20:7-8).

Here also the statutes, judgments, and precepts which are to be kept are treated of.

In the same:

If they have kept thy statutes and judgments, they shall be a holy people unto Jehovah (Deuteronomy 26:16-19).

In David :

We shall be satisfied with the goodness of Thy house, with the holiness of Thy temple (Psalms 65:4).

It is said "to be satisfied with the goodness of Jehovah's house and with the holiness of His temple," because the "house of God" in the highest sense signifies the Lord in respect to Divine good, and "temple" in respect to Divine truth (See Arcana Coelestia 3720). In Zechariah:

In that day there shall be upon the bells of the horses, Holiness unto Jehovah (Zechariah 14:20).

The establishment of a new church is here treated of, and "bells" signify knowledges [scientifica] which are from the intellectual. (That "bells" signify such truths, see Arcana Coelestia 9921, 9926; and that "horse" signifies the intellectual, see in the small work onThe White Horse 1-4.)

[9] From this it can be seen what is represented and signified by this:

That upon the miter which was upon the head of Aaron was placed a plate, upon which was engraved Holiness to Jehovah (Exodus 28:36-38; 39:30-31);

for the "miter" signifies wisdom, which is of Divine truth (See Arcana Coelestia 9827, 9949); so also what it represented and signified by:

That Aaron, his sons, their garments, the altar, the tabernacle, with everything there, were anointed with oil, and thus made holy (Exodus 29:1-36; 30:22-30; Leviticus 8);

for "oil" signified the Divine good of the Divine love, and "sanctification" the proceeding Divine; for it is Divine good that makes holy, and Divine truth is what is holy therefrom.

[10] That the word "holy" is predicated of charity can be seen from what was said above respecting the angels of heaven, namely, that there are some who receive Divine good more than Divine truth, and some who receive Divine truth more than Divine good; the former constitute the Lord's celestial kingdom, and are those who are in love to the Lord, and because they are in love to the Lord are called "righteous" [or "just"]; but the latter constitute the Lord's spiritual kingdom, and are those who are in charity towards the neighbor, and because these are in charity towards the neighbor, they are called "holy [or saints]." (That there are two loves that make heaven, namely, love to the Lord, and love towards the neighbor or charity, and that the heavens are thereby distinguished into two kingdoms, namely, a celestial kingdom and a spiritual kingdom, see in the work on Heaven and Hell. n (Heaven and Hell 13-19) 13-19; 20-28)

  
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Thanks to the Swedenborg Foundation for their permission to use this translation.