Pathways > About the Bible > The Way the Bible was Written

The Way the Bible was Written

The Bible contains many "books". Genesis, the first and oldest one, includes stories from an oral tradition that is perhaps 12,000 years old. The first 5 books are said to have been written by Moses - or at least he led or instigated that project. There are books by prophets, and about kings and histories, and the much-loved book of Psalms, and then the Four Gospels, and more.


The Bible

The Bible... what to make of it? It's been a huge influence on world culture for two thousand years, and on culture in the Middle East for many hundreds of years before that. How should we read it, and use it, today? It makes sense that a loving God would try to communicate true ideas to us, so that we could consider them in our rational minds, and decide what to do with them.

What the Bible says about... its Inner Meaning

What does the Bible say about its own inner meaning? Regardless of whether we prefer a literal or symbolic interpretation, it makes sense to look at how the Bible interprets itself.

What the Bible Says about Its Own Complex Transmission

The real truth of God behind Scripture is not compromised by the complex way it's been transmitted to us. Even if the Word is destroyed, the Lord can have it written again. This Bible Study video by Jonathan Rose digs deeply into this subject, based on Jeremiah 36.

The Universality of the Bible's Inner Meaning

The literal meaning of Scripture is about specific people, places, and events. The inner meaning has a much more universal application.

The Ubiquity of the Bible's Inner Meaning

Within the beautiful sayings and the hard sayings in Scripture, the beatitudes and the begats, there is an inner meaning. It runs throughout and its message of love and hope is beautiful.

Another Breach: The Bible Seems Crude and Archaic, Irrational and Unscientific

... in which we look at how Scripture is viewed from a "scientific" standpoint, and ponder the future of religion and science.


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