Nahum 1

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1 Gánh nặng của Ni-ni-ve. Sách sự hiện thấy của Na-hum, người Eân-cốt.

2 Giê-hô-va là Ðức Chúa Trời ghen và báo thù; Ðức Giê-hô-va báo thù, và đầy sự thạnh nộ. Ðức Giê-hô-va báo thù kẻ cừu địch mình và cưu giận cho kẻ thù mình.

3 Ðức Giê-hô-va chậm giận và có quyền lớn; nhưng Ngài chẳng cầm kẻ mắc tội là vô tội. Ðức Giê-hô-va đi trong gió lốc và bão tố, những đám mây là bụi dưới chơn Ngài.

4 Ngài quở trách biển, làm cho nó khô; và làm cạn hết thảy các sông. Ba-san và Cạt-mên đều mòn mỏi, hoa của Li-ban đều héo rụng.

5 Các núi run rẩy vì cớ Ngài, các đồi tan chảy; đất và thế gian cũng dân cư trên đất đều dậy lên trước mặt Ngài.

6 Ai đứng được trước sự thạnh nộ Ngài? Ai đương nổi sự nóng giận Ngài? Sự tức giận của Ngài đổ ra như lửa, những vầng đá vỡ ra bởi Ngài.

7 Ðức Giê-hô-va là tốt lành, làm đồn lũy trong ngày hoạn nạn, và biết những kẻ ẩn náu nơi Ngài.

8 Ngài dùng nước lụt hủy diệt chỗ nó, và đuổi kẻ thù nghịch mình vào sự tối tăm.

9 Các ngươi sẽ lập mưu gì nghịch cùng Ðức Giê-hô-va? Ngài sẽ diệt hết cả, sẽ chẳng có tai nạn dậy lên lần thứ hai.

10 Vì chúng nó xỏ xen như gai gốc, và mê man như say rượu, thì sẽ bị thiêu hủy hết như rơm khô.

11 Ấy là từ ngươi mà ra một kẻ mưu sự dữ nghịch cùng Ðức Giê-hô-va, và toan sự gian ác.

12 Ðức Giê-hô-va phán như vầy: Dầu chúng nó sức mạnh đầy đủ và người đông cũng sẽ bị từ đi và trở nên hư không. Dầu ta đã làm khổ ngươi, song ta sẽ chẳng làm khổ ngươi nữa.

13 Nhưng bấy giờ ta sẽ bẻ gãy ách nó khỏi ngươi, và bứt dứt dây ngươi.

14 Ðức Giê-hô-va đã truyền lịnh về ngươi, từ danh ngươi chẳng sanh ra nữa. Ta sẽ trừ bỏ tượng chạm và tượng đúc khỏi nhà các thần ngươi; ta sẽ làm mồ mả cho ngươi, vì ngươi là hèn mạt.

15 Nầy, trên các núi có chơn của kẻ đem tin lành và rao sự bình an! Hỡi Giu-đa, ngươi nữa, nó sẽ bị diệt sạch.



Exploring the Meaning of Nahum 1      

Napsal(a) Rev. Ian Arnold and Joe David

What's the Book of Nahum about?

We can never really satisfactorily find our way into a book of the Bible, especially a book of the Old Testament, unless we take on board that it's a mirror to us of the inner challenges and experiences we face. Its message, for us, is not about the world outside of us, but about the world inside of us. Beneath the surface, these Bible books focus on this inner world of our thoughts and feelings, burdens and challenges, successes and failures, achievements and disappointments, as we make our journey towards being a more spiritual person.

Most people readily see this "inner meaning" when it comes to the story of Moses leading the ancient people of Israel out of slavery in Egypt to, eventually, the Promised Land. It's movement forward, and movement backward, a longing for what we dream was the past, and more. It speaks to us all.

All of ancient Israel’s enemies symbolize things that attack, plunder, weaken, marginalise and imprison what is from the Lord in our lives. We try to stand up for what's right and decent in a given situation, but in no time, a voice is whispering to us ‘Why bother?’, ‘Who cares?’

Some of those enemies of ancient Israel were fearsome, like the Assyrians and the Babylonians. They were ruthless, rich, powerful and had massive armies.

So think for a moment: what might be amongst the most intimidating ‘enemies’ of our spiritual well-being? What are those things likely to do the most damage?

Babylon has long been recognized as a symbol of power and self-aggrandizement. But what about the Assyrians, who are the antagonists here in the Book of Nahum?

The Assyrians were menacing the ancient Israelites for more than a century, first sweeping away the northern kingdom of Israel in 721 BC, and then hanging around in the area for decades afterwards, a considerable threat to the remaining, southern, kingdom of Judea. How feared and despised they were is so evident in this prophecy of Nahum.

So, in us, what might the Assyrians symbolize? Outside the fortified and walled city of Jerusalem, on one famous occasion they showed themselves to be adept talkers and persuaders. (See the story, in 2 Kings 18).

Hold to this for a moment – “talkers and persuaders”. The thing is that there are those forces and influences that become active within us, trying to talk and persuade us that, for example, sin is fine if it remains undiscovered, or that the Ten Commandments don’t have a place in this day and age, or that 'my lapses are nothing by comparison with what goes on in the world generally'.

If we can see this for what it is, it is pretty fearsome stuff, capable of inflicting great damage to us spiritually.

So, read the Book of Nahum - just 3 chapters of prophecy - with this in mind. It is not people, or tribes, that the Lord pits Himself against - but those very things which hold the potential to devastate us spiritually.

In Chapter 1, “Nineveh” represents a state of life in which we're bringing bad things on ourselves because we aren't basing our lives on spiritual truths from the Lord's Word.

In Nahum 1:2-6, it's saying that Jehovah appears as an enemy to people who are wanting to stay in evil ways. In the spiritual world, all pretences of innocence or any good thing are stripped away, and our true selfish motives are seen.

In Nahum 1:7, there's a hopeful note; people who turn to the Lord and walk with Him are helped.

But, next there's a warning... in Nahum 1:8-11, that people who stick with their false ideas and evils will perish. It's worth noting that, in New Christian thought, there's the concept that God doesn't condemn us; we end up living in a society that fits our own values. If we're essentially selfish, we'll find a spiritual home in a society of essentially selfish people, and... it's probably pretty grim. It's a form of "perishing".

In Nahum 1:12-14, it's talking about people who are in evil because they don't know any better -- it's evil from ignorance. They can be helped if they listen and repent, and allow their false ideas to be removed (as was described in Jonah 3. That's what is meant by this: “…for I will break his, (Belial’s) brace from off thee and pull apart thy bonds.”

Finally, in Nahum 1:15, there's the beginning of a new theme, which leads into Nahum 2.

   Studovat vnitřní smysl

Exploring the Meaning of Nahum 1      

Napsal(a) Rev. Ian Arnold and Joe David

What's the Book of Nahum about?

We can never really satisfactorily find our way into a book of the Bible, especially a book of the Old Testament, unless we take on board that it's a mirror to us of the inner challenges and experiences we face. Its message, for us, is not about the world outside of us, but about the world inside of us. Beneath the surface, these Bible books focus on this inner world of our thoughts and feelings, burdens and challenges, successes and failures, achievements and disappointments, as we make our journey towards being a more spiritual person.

Most people readily see this "inner meaning" when it comes to the story of Moses leading the ancient people of Israel out of slavery in Egypt to, eventually, the Promised Land. It's movement forward, and movement backward, a longing for what we dream was the past, and more. It speaks to us all.

All of ancient Israel’s enemies symbolize things that attack, plunder, weaken, marginalise and imprison what is from the Lord in our lives. We try to stand up for what's right and decent in a given situation, but in no time, a voice is whispering to us ‘Why bother?’, ‘Who cares?’

Some of those enemies of ancient Israel were fearsome, like the Assyrians and the Babylonians. They were ruthless, rich, powerful and had massive armies.

So think for a moment: what might be amongst the most intimidating ‘enemies’ of our spiritual well-being? What are those things likely to do the most damage?

Babylon has long been recognized as a symbol of power and self-aggrandizement. But what about the Assyrians, who are the antagonists here in the Book of Nahum?

The Assyrians were menacing the ancient Israelites for more than a century, first sweeping away the northern kingdom of Israel in 721 BC, and then hanging around in the area for decades afterwards, a considerable threat to the remaining, southern, kingdom of Judea. How feared and despised they were is so evident in this prophecy of Nahum.

So, in us, what might the Assyrians symbolize? Outside the fortified and walled city of Jerusalem, on one famous occasion they showed themselves to be adept talkers and persuaders. (See the story, in 2 Kings 18).

Hold to this for a moment – “talkers and persuaders”. The thing is that there are those forces and influences that become active within us, trying to talk and persuade us that, for example, sin is fine if it remains undiscovered, or that the Ten Commandments don’t have a place in this day and age, or that 'my lapses are nothing by comparison with what goes on in the world generally'.

If we can see this for what it is, it is pretty fearsome stuff, capable of inflicting great damage to us spiritually.

So, read the Book of Nahum - just 3 chapters of prophecy - with this in mind. It is not people, or tribes, that the Lord pits Himself against - but those very things which hold the potential to devastate us spiritually.

In Chapter 1, “Nineveh” represents a state of life in which we're bringing bad things on ourselves because we aren't basing our lives on spiritual truths from the Lord's Word.

In Nahum 1:2-6, it's saying that Jehovah appears as an enemy to people who are wanting to stay in evil ways. In the spiritual world, all pretences of innocence or any good thing are stripped away, and our true selfish motives are seen.

In Nahum 1:7, there's a hopeful note; people who turn to the Lord and walk with Him are helped.

But, next there's a warning... in Nahum 1:8-11, that people who stick with their false ideas and evils will perish. It's worth noting that, in New Christian thought, there's the concept that God doesn't condemn us; we end up living in a society that fits our own values. If we're essentially selfish, we'll find a spiritual home in a society of essentially selfish people, and... it's probably pretty grim. It's a form of "perishing".

In Nahum 1:12-14, it's talking about people who are in evil because they don't know any better -- it's evil from ignorance. They can be helped if they listen and repent, and allow their false ideas to be removed (as was described in Jonah 3. That's what is meant by this: “…for I will break his, (Belial’s) brace from off thee and pull apart thy bonds.”

Finally, in Nahum 1:15, there's the beginning of a new theme, which leads into Nahum 2.

Swedenborg

Hlavní výklad ze Swedenborgových prací:

The Inner Meaning of the Prophets and Psalms 222


Další odkazy Swedenborga k této kapitole:

Arcana Coelestia 2162, 2606, 6435, 7093, 9406, 9553, 10325

Apocalypse Revealed 331, 336, 343, 350, 409, 478, 551

Doctrine of the Sacred Scripture 51


Odkazy ze Swedenborgových nevydaných prací:

Apocalypse Explained 36, 69, 400, 405, 411, 414, 419, ...

Coronis (An Appendix to True Christian Religion) 34, 58

Scriptural Confirmations 4, 9, 58, 76

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Významy biblických slov

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A burden (Jer. 17:4) signifies that which is from the proprium of man.

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'Nineveh' signifies the falsities of doctrinal matters, also the Gentiles, or the falsities originating in the fallacies of the senses, in the obscurity of an...

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(Rev. 10:9.) "And I went unto the angel, saying, give me the little book," signifies the faculty of perceiving the quality of the Word from...

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'To be avenged seventy and seven fold' denotes damnation.

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Kẻ thù
An enemy in the Bible refers to people who are in the love of evil and the false thinking that springs from evil. On a...

những đám mây
In Isaiah 19:1, "Jehovah rides upon a light cloud, and comes into Egypt", signifies the visitation of the natural man from spiritual-natural Divine Truth, for...

Đám mây
In Isaiah 19:1, "Jehovah rides upon a light cloud, and comes into Egypt", signifies the visitation of the natural man from spiritual-natural Divine Truth, for...

biển
Water generally represents what Swedenborg calls “natural truth,” or true concepts about day-to-day matters and physical things. Since all water ultimately flows into the seas,...

Khô
Dryness (Jer. 14:6) signifies where there is no good and truth.

sông
'Rivers' signify truths in abundance serving the rational self, and so, the understanding, for the purpose of doctrine and life. 'Rivers' or 'floods' signify temptations....

hoa
The budding and fructification of a tree represent the rebirth of man. The growing green from the leaves represents the first state, the blossoming the...

núi
The Writings tell us that the Lord's love is the sun of heaven, and it is natural for us to look above ourselves to the...

run rẩy
'To tremble,' as in Jeremiah 10:10, relates to the church when falsities are believed and called truths.

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'Hills' signify the good of charity.

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