Nahúm 1

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1 Carga de Nínive. Libro de la visión de Nahum de Elcos.

2 Dios celoso y vengador es el SEÑOR; vengador es el SEÑOR, y SEÑOR de ira; el SEÑOR, que se venga de sus adversarios, y que guarda su enojo para sus enemigos.

3 El SEÑOR es tardo para la ira, y grande en poder, y no tendrá al culpado por inocente. El SEÑOR cuyo camino es en tempestad y turbión, y las nubes son el polvo de sus pies.

4 El reprende al mar, y lo hace secar, y hace secar todos los ríos; Basán fue destruido, y el Carmelo, y la flor del Líbano fue destruida.

5 Los montes tiemblan de él, y los collados se deslíen; y la tierra se abrasa delante de su presencia, y el mundo, y todos los que en él habitan.

6 ¿Quién permanecerá delante de su ira? ¿Y quién quedará en pie en el furor de su enojo? Su ira se derrama como fuego, y las peñas se rompen por él.

7 Bueno es el SEÑOR para fortaleza en el día de la angustia; y conoce a los que en él confían.

8 Mas con inundación pasante hará consumación de su lugar, y tinieblas perseguirán a sus enemigos.

9 ¿Qué pensáis contra el SEÑOR? El hace consumación; no se levantará dos veces la tribulación.

10 Porque como espinas entretejidas, mientras se embriagarán los borrachos, serán consumidos del fuego, como las estopas llenas de sequedad.

11 De ti salió el que pensó mal contra el SEÑOR, un consejero impío.

12 Así dijo el SEÑOR: Aunque más reposo tengan, y sean tantos, así serán talados, y él pasará. Bien que te he afligido, no más te afligiré.

13 Porque ahora quebraré su yugo de sobre ti, y romperé tus coyundas.

14 Mas acerca de ti mandará el SEÑOR, que nunca más sea sembrado alguno de tu nombre: de la casa de tu dios talaré escultura y estatua de fundición, la haré tu sepulcro; porque fuiste vil.

15 He aquí sobre los montes están ya los pies del que trae buenas nuevas, del que pregona la paz. Celebra, oh Judá, tus fiestas, cumple tus votos: porque nunca más pasará por ti el impío; él fue talado del todo.



Exploring the Meaning of Nahúm 1      

Napsal(a) Rev. Ian Arnold and Joe David

What's the Book of Nahum about?

We can never really satisfactorily find our way into a book of the Bible, especially a book of the Old Testament, unless we take on board that it's a mirror to us of the inner challenges and experiences we face. Its message, for us, is not about the world outside of us, but about the world inside of us. Beneath the surface, these Bible books focus on this inner world of our thoughts and feelings, burdens and challenges, successes and failures, achievements and disappointments, as we make our journey towards being a more spiritual person.

Most people readily see this "inner meaning" when it comes to the story of Moses leading the ancient people of Israel out of slavery in Egypt to, eventually, the Promised Land. It's movement forward, and movement backward, a longing for what we dream was the past, and more. It speaks to us all.

All of ancient Israel’s enemies symbolize things that attack, plunder, weaken, marginalise and imprison what is from the Lord in our lives. We try to stand up for what's right and decent in a given situation, but in no time, a voice is whispering to us ‘Why bother?’, ‘Who cares?’

Some of those enemies of ancient Israel were fearsome, like the Assyrians and the Babylonians. They were ruthless, rich, powerful and had massive armies.

So think for a moment: what might be amongst the most intimidating ‘enemies’ of our spiritual well-being? What are those things likely to do the most damage?

Babylon has long been recognized as a symbol of power and self-aggrandizement. But what about the Assyrians, who are the antagonists here in the Book of Nahum?

The Assyrians were menacing the ancient Israelites for more than a century, first sweeping away the northern kingdom of Israel in 721 BC, and then hanging around in the area for decades afterwards, a considerable threat to the remaining, southern, kingdom of Judea. How feared and despised they were is so evident in this prophecy of Nahum.

So, in us, what might the Assyrians symbolize? Outside the fortified and walled city of Jerusalem, on one famous occasion they showed themselves to be adept talkers and persuaders. (See the story, in 2 Kings 18).

Hold to this for a moment – “talkers and persuaders”. The thing is that there are those forces and influences that become active within us, trying to talk and persuade us that, for example, sin is fine if it remains undiscovered, or that the Ten Commandments don’t have a place in this day and age, or that 'my lapses are nothing by comparison with what goes on in the world generally'.

If we can see this for what it is, it is pretty fearsome stuff, capable of inflicting great damage to us spiritually.

So, read the Book of Nahum - just 3 chapters of prophecy - with this in mind. It is not people, or tribes, that the Lord pits Himself against - but those very things which hold the potential to devastate us spiritually.

In Chapter 1, “Nineveh” represents a state of life in which we're bringing bad things on ourselves because we aren't basing our lives on spiritual truths from the Lord's Word.

In Nahum 1:2-6, it's saying that Jehovah appears as an enemy to people who are wanting to stay in evil ways. In the spiritual world, all pretences of innocence or any good thing are stripped away, and our true selfish motives are seen.

In Nahum 1:7, there's a hopeful note; people who turn to the Lord and walk with Him are helped.

But, next there's a warning... in Nahum 1:8-11, that people who stick with their false ideas and evils will perish. It's worth noting that, in New Christian thought, there's the concept that God doesn't condemn us; we end up living in a society that fits our own values. If we're essentially selfish, we'll find a spiritual home in a society of essentially selfish people, and... it's probably pretty grim. It's a form of "perishing".

In Nahum 1:12-14, it's talking about people who are in evil because they don't know any better -- it's evil from ignorance. They can be helped if they listen and repent, and allow their false ideas to be removed (as was described in Jonah 3. That's what is meant by this: “…for I will break his, (Belial’s) brace from off thee and pull apart thy bonds.”

Finally, in Nahum 1:15, there's the beginning of a new theme, which leads into Nahum 2.

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Exploring the Meaning of Nahum 1      

Napsal(a) Rev. Ian Arnold and Joe David

What's the Book of Nahum about?

We can never really satisfactorily find our way into a book of the Bible, especially a book of the Old Testament, unless we take on board that it's a mirror to us of the inner challenges and experiences we face. Its message, for us, is not about the world outside of us, but about the world inside of us. Beneath the surface, these Bible books focus on this inner world of our thoughts and feelings, burdens and challenges, successes and failures, achievements and disappointments, as we make our journey towards being a more spiritual person.

Most people readily see this "inner meaning" when it comes to the story of Moses leading the ancient people of Israel out of slavery in Egypt to, eventually, the Promised Land. It's movement forward, and movement backward, a longing for what we dream was the past, and more. It speaks to us all.

All of ancient Israel’s enemies symbolize things that attack, plunder, weaken, marginalise and imprison what is from the Lord in our lives. We try to stand up for what's right and decent in a given situation, but in no time, a voice is whispering to us ‘Why bother?’, ‘Who cares?’

Some of those enemies of ancient Israel were fearsome, like the Assyrians and the Babylonians. They were ruthless, rich, powerful and had massive armies.

So think for a moment: what might be amongst the most intimidating ‘enemies’ of our spiritual well-being? What are those things likely to do the most damage?

Babylon has long been recognized as a symbol of power and self-aggrandizement. But what about the Assyrians, who are the antagonists here in the Book of Nahum?

The Assyrians were menacing the ancient Israelites for more than a century, first sweeping away the northern kingdom of Israel in 721 BC, and then hanging around in the area for decades afterwards, a considerable threat to the remaining, southern, kingdom of Judea. How feared and despised they were is so evident in this prophecy of Nahum.

So, in us, what might the Assyrians symbolize? Outside the fortified and walled city of Jerusalem, on one famous occasion they showed themselves to be adept talkers and persuaders. (See the story, in 2 Kings 18).

Hold to this for a moment – “talkers and persuaders”. The thing is that there are those forces and influences that become active within us, trying to talk and persuade us that, for example, sin is fine if it remains undiscovered, or that the Ten Commandments don’t have a place in this day and age, or that 'my lapses are nothing by comparison with what goes on in the world generally'.

If we can see this for what it is, it is pretty fearsome stuff, capable of inflicting great damage to us spiritually.

So, read the Book of Nahum - just 3 chapters of prophecy - with this in mind. It is not people, or tribes, that the Lord pits Himself against - but those very things which hold the potential to devastate us spiritually.

In Chapter 1, “Nineveh” represents a state of life in which we're bringing bad things on ourselves because we aren't basing our lives on spiritual truths from the Lord's Word.

In Nahum 1:2-6, it's saying that Jehovah appears as an enemy to people who are wanting to stay in evil ways. In the spiritual world, all pretences of innocence or any good thing are stripped away, and our true selfish motives are seen.

In Nahum 1:7, there's a hopeful note; people who turn to the Lord and walk with Him are helped.

But, next there's a warning... in Nahum 1:8-11, that people who stick with their false ideas and evils will perish. It's worth noting that, in New Christian thought, there's the concept that God doesn't condemn us; we end up living in a society that fits our own values. If we're essentially selfish, we'll find a spiritual home in a society of essentially selfish people, and... it's probably pretty grim. It's a form of "perishing".

In Nahum 1:12-14, it's talking about people who are in evil because they don't know any better -- it's evil from ignorance. They can be helped if they listen and repent, and allow their false ideas to be removed (as was described in Jonah 3. That's what is meant by this: “…for I will break his, (Belial’s) brace from off thee and pull apart thy bonds.”

Finally, in Nahum 1:15, there's the beginning of a new theme, which leads into Nahum 2.

Swedenborg

Hlavní výklad ze Swedenborgových prací:

The Inner Meaning of the Prophets and Psalms 222


Další odkazy Swedenborga k této kapitole:

Arcana Coelestia 2162, 2606, 6435, 7093, 9406, 9553, 10325

Apocalypse Revealed 331, 336, 343, 350, 409, 478, 551

Doctrine of the Sacred Scripture 51


Odkazy ze Swedenborgových nevydaných prací:

Apocalypse Explained 36, 69, 400, 405, 411, 414, 419, ...

Coronis (An Appendix to True Christian Religion) 34, 58

Scriptural Confirmations 4, 9, 58, 76

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Významy biblických slov

Carga
A burden (Jer. 17:4) signifies that which is from the proprium of man.

Nínive
'Nineveh' signifies the falsities of doctrinal matters, also the Gentiles, or the falsities originating in the fallacies of the senses, in the obscurity of an...

libro
(Rev. 10:9.) "And I went unto the angel, saying, give me the little book," signifies the faculty of perceiving the quality of the Word from...

visión
Vision is the innermost revelation, which is of perception. Visions are according to the state of humankind. The visions of people whose interiors are closed,...

señor
The Lord, in the simplest terms, is love itself expressed as wisdom itself. In philosophic terms, love is the Lord's substance and wisdom is His...

adversarios
Foes, or adversaries, denote the falsities of evil. Foes, or adversaries, when predicate of the Lord, signifies to avert falsities derived from evil.

Enemigos
An enemy in the Bible refers to people who are in the love of evil and the false thinking that springs from evil. On a...

ira
La ira es una emoción tan común en la gente que no requiere definición. Sin embargo, se pueden plantear un par de puntos de interés....

Camino
'To set a way,' as in Genesis 30:36, signifies being separated.

nubes
In Isaiah 19:1, "Jehovah rides upon a light cloud, and comes into Egypt", signifies the visitation of the natural man from spiritual-natural Divine Truth, for...

pies
The foot, as in Deuteronomy 33:3, signifies an inferior principle. To set the right foot on the sea and the left on the earth, as...

mar
Water generally represents what Swedenborg calls “natural truth,” or true concepts about day-to-day matters and physical things. Since all water ultimately flows into the seas,...

ríos
'Rivers' signify truths in abundance serving the rational self, and so, the understanding, for the purpose of doctrine and life. 'Rivers' or 'floods' signify temptations....

Carmelo
Carmel (Isa. 16:10) signifies the good of the church. Carmel also signifies the celestial church. (Isa. 35:2.)

flor
The budding and fructification of a tree represent the rebirth of man. The growing green from the leaves represents the first state, the blossoming the...

Líbano
'Lebanon' signifies spiritual good. 'Lebanon' signifies the church regarding the perception of truth from the rational self.

montes
The Writings tell us that the Lord's love is the sun of heaven, and it is natural for us to look above ourselves to the...

la tierra
"Tierra" en la Biblia puede significar una persona o un grupo de personas con ideas afines como en una iglesia. Pero se refiere específicamente a...

Tierra
"Tierra" en la Biblia puede significar una persona o un grupo de personas con ideas afines como en una iglesia. Pero se refiere específicamente a...

mundo
The term "world" has both general and more specific meanings in the Bible, including the relatively literal sense of the natural, physical world. In more...

en pie
'To stand,' and 'come forth' as in Daniel 7:10, refers to truth. In Genesis 24:13, it signifies a state of conjunction of divine truth with...

fuego
Just as natural fire can be both comforting in keeping you warm or scary in burning down your house, so fire in the spiritual sense...

bueno
It seems rather circular to say that “good” in the Bible represents good, but in a general sense it’s true! The case is this: The...

Día
"Day" describes a state in which we are turned toward the Lord, and are receiving light (which is truth) and heat (which is a desire...

tinieblas
"Oscuridad" es un estado sin luz. La "luz" es la verdad del Señor, así que la "oscuridad" representa un estado en el que falta la...

mal
'To hurt,' as mentioned in Revelation 6:6, signifies violation and profanation. 'To hurt' as mentioned in Revelation 9:4, signifies perverting the truths and goods of...

dijo
As with many common verbs, the meaning of “to say” in the Bible is highly dependent on context. Who is speaking? Who is hearing? What...

nombre
It's easy to see that names are important in the Bible. Jehovah changed Abram and Sarai to Abraham and Sarah, changed Jacob to Israel and...

casa
A "house" is essentially a container - for a person, for a family, for several families or even for a large group with shared interests...

Dios
El Señor es el amor mismo, expresado en la forma de la sabiduría misma. El amor, entonces, es su esencia, su interior. La sabiduría -...

Judá
City of Judah,' as in Isaiah 40:9, signifies the doctrine of love towards the Lord and love towards our neighbor in its whole extent.

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