Nahum 1

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1 Onus Ninive. Liber visionis Nahum Elcesæi.

2 Deus æmulator, et ulciscens Dominus : ulciscens Dominus, et habens furorem : ulciscens Dominus in hostes suos, et irascens ipse inimicis suis.

3 Dominus patiens, et magnus fortitudine, et mundans non faciet innocentem. Dominus in tempestate et turbine viæ ejus, et nebulæ pulvis pedum ejus.

4 Increpans mare, et exsiccans illud, et omnia flumina ad desertum deducens. Infirmatus est Basan et Carmelus, et flos Libani elanguit.

5 Montes commoti sunt ab eo, et colles desolati sunt : et contremuit terra a facie ejus, et orbis, et omnes habitatores in eo.

6 Ante faciem indignationis ejus quis stabit ? et quis resistet in ira furoris ejus ? Indignatio ejus effusa est ut ignis, et petræ dissolutæ sunt ab eo.

7 Bonus Dominus, et confortans in die tribulationis, et sciens sperantes in se.

8 Et in diluvio prætereunte consummationem faciet loci ejus, et inimicos ejus persequentur tenebræ.

9 Quid cogitatis contra Dominum ? Consummationem ipse faciet : non consurget duplex tribulatio,

10 quia sicut spinæ se invicem complectuntur, sic convivium eorum pariter potantium ; consumentur quasi stipula ariditate plena.

11 Ex te exibit cogitans contra Dominum malitiam, mente pertractans prævaricationem.

12 Hæc dicit Dominus : Si perfecti fuerint, et ita plures, sic quoque attondentur, et pertransibit : afflixi te, et non affligam te ultra.

13 Et nunc conteram virgam ejus de dorso tuo, et vincula tua disrumpam.

14 Et præcipiet super te Dominus ; non seminabitur ex nomine tuo amplius : de domo Dei tui interficiam sculptile, et conflatile ; ponam sepulchrum tuum, quia inhonoratus es.

15 Ecce super montes pedes evangelizantis, et annuntiantis pacem. Celebra, Juda, festivitates tuas, et redde vota tua, quia non adjiciet ultra ut pertranseat in te Belial : universus interiit.



Exploring the Meaning of Nahum 1      

Napsal(a) Rev. Ian Arnold and Joe David

What's the Book of Nahum about?

We can never really satisfactorily find our way into a book of the Bible, especially a book of the Old Testament, unless we take on board that it's a mirror to us of the inner challenges and experiences we face. Its message, for us, is not about the world outside of us, but about the world inside of us. Beneath the surface, these Bible books focus on this inner world of our thoughts and feelings, burdens and challenges, successes and failures, achievements and disappointments, as we make our journey towards being a more spiritual person.

Most people readily see this "inner meaning" when it comes to the story of Moses leading the ancient people of Israel out of slavery in Egypt to, eventually, the Promised Land. It's movement forward, and movement backward, a longing for what we dream was the past, and more. It speaks to us all.

All of ancient Israel’s enemies symbolize things that attack, plunder, weaken, marginalise and imprison what is from the Lord in our lives. We try to stand up for what's right and decent in a given situation, but in no time, a voice is whispering to us ‘Why bother?’, ‘Who cares?’

Some of those enemies of ancient Israel were fearsome, like the Assyrians and the Babylonians. They were ruthless, rich, powerful and had massive armies.

So think for a moment: what might be amongst the most intimidating ‘enemies’ of our spiritual well-being? What are those things likely to do the most damage?

Babylon has long been recognized as a symbol of power and self-aggrandizement. But what about the Assyrians, who are the antagonists here in the Book of Nahum?

The Assyrians were menacing the ancient Israelites for more than a century, first sweeping away the northern kingdom of Israel in 721 BC, and then hanging around in the area for decades afterwards, a considerable threat to the remaining, southern, kingdom of Judea. How feared and despised they were is so evident in this prophecy of Nahum.

So, in us, what might the Assyrians symbolize? Outside the fortified and walled city of Jerusalem, on one famous occasion they showed themselves to be adept talkers and persuaders. (See the story, in 2 Kings 18).

Hold to this for a moment – “talkers and persuaders”. The thing is that there are those forces and influences that become active within us, trying to talk and persuade us that, for example, sin is fine if it remains undiscovered, or that the Ten Commandments don’t have a place in this day and age, or that 'my lapses are nothing by comparison with what goes on in the world generally'.

If we can see this for what it is, it is pretty fearsome stuff, capable of inflicting great damage to us spiritually.

So, read the Book of Nahum - just 3 chapters of prophecy - with this in mind. It is not people, or tribes, that the Lord pits Himself against - but those very things which hold the potential to devastate us spiritually.

In Chapter 1, “Nineveh” represents a state of life in which we're bringing bad things on ourselves because we aren't basing our lives on spiritual truths from the Lord's Word.

In Nahum 1:2-6, it's saying that Jehovah appears as an enemy to people who are wanting to stay in evil ways. In the spiritual world, all pretences of innocence or any good thing are stripped away, and our true selfish motives are seen.

In Nahum 1:7, there's a hopeful note; people who turn to the Lord and walk with Him are helped.

But, next there's a warning... in Nahum 1:8-11, that people who stick with their false ideas and evils will perish. It's worth noting that, in New Christian thought, there's the concept that God doesn't condemn us; we end up living in a society that fits our own values. If we're essentially selfish, we'll find a spiritual home in a society of essentially selfish people, and... it's probably pretty grim. It's a form of "perishing".

In Nahum 1:12-14, it's talking about people who are in evil because they don't know any better -- it's evil from ignorance. They can be helped if they listen and repent, and allow their false ideas to be removed (as was described in Jonah 3. That's what is meant by this: “…for I will break his, (Belial’s) brace from off thee and pull apart thy bonds.”

Finally, in Nahum 1:15, there's the beginning of a new theme, which leads into Nahum 2.

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Exploring the Meaning of Nahum 1      

Napsal(a) Rev. Ian Arnold and Joe David

What's the Book of Nahum about?

We can never really satisfactorily find our way into a book of the Bible, especially a book of the Old Testament, unless we take on board that it's a mirror to us of the inner challenges and experiences we face. Its message, for us, is not about the world outside of us, but about the world inside of us. Beneath the surface, these Bible books focus on this inner world of our thoughts and feelings, burdens and challenges, successes and failures, achievements and disappointments, as we make our journey towards being a more spiritual person.

Most people readily see this "inner meaning" when it comes to the story of Moses leading the ancient people of Israel out of slavery in Egypt to, eventually, the Promised Land. It's movement forward, and movement backward, a longing for what we dream was the past, and more. It speaks to us all.

All of ancient Israel’s enemies symbolize things that attack, plunder, weaken, marginalise and imprison what is from the Lord in our lives. We try to stand up for what's right and decent in a given situation, but in no time, a voice is whispering to us ‘Why bother?’, ‘Who cares?’

Some of those enemies of ancient Israel were fearsome, like the Assyrians and the Babylonians. They were ruthless, rich, powerful and had massive armies.

So think for a moment: what might be amongst the most intimidating ‘enemies’ of our spiritual well-being? What are those things likely to do the most damage?

Babylon has long been recognized as a symbol of power and self-aggrandizement. But what about the Assyrians, who are the antagonists here in the Book of Nahum?

The Assyrians were menacing the ancient Israelites for more than a century, first sweeping away the northern kingdom of Israel in 721 BC, and then hanging around in the area for decades afterwards, a considerable threat to the remaining, southern, kingdom of Judea. How feared and despised they were is so evident in this prophecy of Nahum.

So, in us, what might the Assyrians symbolize? Outside the fortified and walled city of Jerusalem, on one famous occasion they showed themselves to be adept talkers and persuaders. (See the story, in 2 Kings 18).

Hold to this for a moment – “talkers and persuaders”. The thing is that there are those forces and influences that become active within us, trying to talk and persuade us that, for example, sin is fine if it remains undiscovered, or that the Ten Commandments don’t have a place in this day and age, or that 'my lapses are nothing by comparison with what goes on in the world generally'.

If we can see this for what it is, it is pretty fearsome stuff, capable of inflicting great damage to us spiritually.

So, read the Book of Nahum - just 3 chapters of prophecy - with this in mind. It is not people, or tribes, that the Lord pits Himself against - but those very things which hold the potential to devastate us spiritually.

In Chapter 1, “Nineveh” represents a state of life in which we're bringing bad things on ourselves because we aren't basing our lives on spiritual truths from the Lord's Word.

In Nahum 1:2-6, it's saying that Jehovah appears as an enemy to people who are wanting to stay in evil ways. In the spiritual world, all pretences of innocence or any good thing are stripped away, and our true selfish motives are seen.

In Nahum 1:7, there's a hopeful note; people who turn to the Lord and walk with Him are helped.

But, next there's a warning... in Nahum 1:8-11, that people who stick with their false ideas and evils will perish. It's worth noting that, in New Christian thought, there's the concept that God doesn't condemn us; we end up living in a society that fits our own values. If we're essentially selfish, we'll find a spiritual home in a society of essentially selfish people, and... it's probably pretty grim. It's a form of "perishing".

In Nahum 1:12-14, it's talking about people who are in evil because they don't know any better -- it's evil from ignorance. They can be helped if they listen and repent, and allow their false ideas to be removed (as was described in Jonah 3. That's what is meant by this: “…for I will break his, (Belial’s) brace from off thee and pull apart thy bonds.”

Finally, in Nahum 1:15, there's the beginning of a new theme, which leads into Nahum 2.

Swedenborg

Hlavní výklad ze Swedenborgových prací:

De Sensu Interno Librorum Propheticorum et Psalmorum Davidis 222


Další odkazy Swedenborga k této kapitole:

Arcana Coelestia 2162, 2606, 6435, 7093, 9406, 9553, 10325

Apocalypsis Revelata 331, 336, 343, 350, 409, 478, 551

Doctrina Novae Hierosolymae de Scriptura Sacra 51


Odkazy ze Swedenborgových nevydaných prací:

Apocalypsis Explicata 36, 69, 400, 405, 411, 414, 419, ...

Coronis 34, 58

Scriptural Confirmations 4, 9, 58, 76

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Skočit na podobné biblické verše

Genesis 10:11

Exodus 15:7, 34:6, 7, 14

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Deuteronomium 4:24, 7:10, 32:35

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1 Samuelis 2:9

3 Regum 19:11

4 Regum 36

Paralipomenon 2 13:18

Hiob 9:4, 5, 26:11, 38:1

Psalmi 1:6, 9:10

Psalms 18:8, 16, 46:2, 76:8, 94:1, 100:5, 104:32, 106:9

Esaias 10:5, 13:13, 28:18, 33:9, 14, 37:36, 47:14, 50:2, 10

Jeremias 4:24, 10:10, 28:8, 50:15

Threni 2:3, 4

Ezechiel 38:20

Daniel 5:27

Ezekiel 9:5

Nahum 3:11

Zephanias 2:13

II ad Timotheum 19

Apocalypsis 6:17

Významy biblických slov

onus
A burden (Jer. 17:4) signifies that which is from the proprium of man.

liber
(Rev. 10:9.) "And I went unto the angel, saying, give me the little book," signifies the faculty of perceiving the quality of the Word from...

dominus
The Lord, in the simplest terms, is love itself expressed as wisdom itself. In philosophic terms, love is the Lord's substance and wisdom is His...

hostes
Foes, or adversaries, denote the falsities of evil. Foes, or adversaries, when predicate of the Lord, signifies to avert falsities derived from evil.

mare
Water generally represents what Swedenborg calls “natural truth,” or true concepts about day-to-day matters and physical things. Since all water ultimately flows into the seas,...

flos
The budding and fructification of a tree represent the rebirth of man. The growing green from the leaves represents the first state, the blossoming the...

terra
Is there any difference in meaning between “earth” and “ground”? At first it doesn’t seem so; both refer to the soil making up the land...

ante
In most cases, the meaning of "before" is pretty straightforward, both as a way of assessing relative time, and in its use meaning "in someone's...

faciem
“The eyes are the windows of the soul.” That’s a sentiment with roots somewhere in murky antiquity, but one that has become hopelessly cliché because...

stabit
'To stay with,' as in Genesis 32:4, relates to the life of truth when accompanied by good, and in this instance, it means to take...

ira
'Wrath,' as in Genesis 49:7, signifies aversion from truth. 'Great wrath,' as in Revelation 12:12, signifies hatred against the new church.

ignis
Just as natural fire can be both comforting in keeping you warm or scary in burning down your house, so fire in the spiritual sense...

tenebræ
"Darkness" is a state without light. "Light" is truth from the Lord, so "darkness" represents a state where truth is lacking. Here's a cogent passage...

stipula ariditate plena
'To be consumed as stubble' denotes total vastation.

plena
'To satiate' relates to the extent of a person's will, for good or evil.

dicit
As with many common verbs, the meaning of “to say” in the Bible is highly dependent on context. Who is speaking? Who is hearing? What...

nomine
It's easy to see that names are important in the Bible. Jehovah changed Abram and Sarai to Abraham and Sarah, changed Jacob to Israel and...

sculptile
'An image' signifies falsities from self-derived intelligence.

juda
City of Judah,' as in Isaiah 40:9, signifies the doctrine of love towards the Lord and love towards our neighbor in its whole extent.

redde
'To reward' signifies meting out punishment.

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