Nahum 1

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1 Dies ist die Last über Ninive und das Buch der Weissagung Nahums von Elkos.

2 Der HERR ist ein eifriger Gott und ein Rächer, ja, ein Rächer ist der HERR und zornig; der HERR ist ein Rächer wider seine Widersacher und der es seinen Feinden nicht vergessen wird.

3 Der HERR ist geduldig und von großer Kraft, vor welchem niemand unschuldig ist; er ist der HERR, des Weg in Wetter und Sturm ist und Gewölke der Staub unter seinen Füßen,

4 der das Meer schilt und trocken macht und alle Wasser vertrocknet. Basan und Karmel verschmachten; und was auf dem Berge Libanon blüht, verschmachtet.

5 Die Berge zittern vor ihm, und die Hügel zergehen; das Erdreich bebt vor ihm, der Weltkreis und alle, die darauf wohnen.

6 Wer kann vor seinem Zorn stehen, und wer kann seinen Grimm bleiben? Sein Zorn brennt wie Feuer, und die Felsen zerspringen vor ihm.

7 Der HERR ist gütig und eine Feste zur Zeit der Not und kennt die, die auf ihn trauen.

8 Er läßt die Flut überher laufen und macht derselben Stätte ein Ende, und seine Feinde verfolgt er mit Finsternis.

9 Was gedenkt ihr wider den HERRN? Er wird doch ein Ende machen; es wird das Unglück nicht zweimal kommen.

10 Denn wenn sie gleich sind wie die Dornen, die noch ineinanderwachsen und im besten Saft sind, so sollen sie doch verbrannt werden wie dürres Stroh.

11 Denn von dir ist gekommen der Schalksrat, der Böses wider den HERRN gedachte.

12 So spricht der HERR: Sie kommen so gerüstet und mächtig, wie sie wollen, so sollen sie doch umgehauen werden und dahinfahren. Ich habe dich gedemütigt; aber ich will dich nicht wiederum demütigen.

13 Alsdann will ich sein Joch, das du trägst, zerbrechen und deine Bande zerreißen.

14 Aber wider dich hat der HERR geboten, daß deines Namens kein Same mehr soll bleiben. Vom Hause deines Gottes will ich dich ausrotten, die Götzen und Bilder will ich dir zum Grab machen; denn du bist zunichte geworden.

15 2:1 Siehe, auf den Bergen kommen Füße eines guten Boten, der da Frieden verkündigt! Halte deine Feiertage, Juda, und bezahle deine Gelübde! denn es wird der Arge nicht mehr über dich kommen; er ist ganz ausgerottet.


Exploring the Meaning of Nahum 1      

Napsal(a) Rev. Ian Arnold and Joe David

What's the Book of Nahum about?

We can never really satisfactorily find our way into a book of the Bible, especially a book of the Old Testament, unless we take on board that it's a mirror to us of the inner challenges and experiences we face. Its message, for us, is not about the world outside of us, but about the world inside of us. Beneath the surface, these Bible books focus on this inner world of our thoughts and feelings, burdens and challenges, successes and failures, achievements and disappointments, as we make our journey towards being a more spiritual person.

Most people readily see this "inner meaning" when it comes to the story of Moses leading the ancient people of Israel out of slavery in Egypt to, eventually, the Promised Land. It's movement forward, and movement backward, a longing for what we dream was the past, and more. It speaks to us all.

All of ancient Israel’s enemies symbolize things that attack, plunder, weaken, marginalise and imprison what is from the Lord in our lives. We try to stand up for what's right and decent in a given situation, but in no time, a voice is whispering to us ‘Why bother?’, ‘Who cares?’

Some of those enemies of ancient Israel were fearsome, like the Assyrians and the Babylonians. They were ruthless, rich, powerful and had massive armies.

So think for a moment: what might be amongst the most intimidating ‘enemies’ of our spiritual well-being? What are those things likely to do the most damage?

Babylon has long been recognized as a symbol of power and self-aggrandizement. But what about the Assyrians, who are the antagonists here in the Book of Nahum?

The Assyrians were menacing the ancient Israelites for more than a century, first sweeping away the northern kingdom of Israel in 721 BC, and then hanging around in the area for decades afterwards, a considerable threat to the remaining, southern, kingdom of Judea. How feared and despised they were is so evident in this prophecy of Nahum.

So, in us, what might the Assyrians symbolize? Outside the fortified and walled city of Jerusalem, on one famous occasion they showed themselves to be adept talkers and persuaders. (See the story, in 2 Kings 18).

Hold to this for a moment – “talkers and persuaders”. The thing is that there are those forces and influences that become active within us, trying to talk and persuade us that, for example, sin is fine if it remains undiscovered, or that the Ten Commandments don’t have a place in this day and age, or that 'my lapses are nothing by comparison with what goes on in the world generally'.

If we can see this for what it is, it is pretty fearsome stuff, capable of inflicting great damage to us spiritually.

So, read the Book of Nahum - just 3 chapters of prophecy - with this in mind. It is not people, or tribes, that the Lord pits Himself against - but those very things which hold the potential to devastate us spiritually.

In Chapter 1, “Nineveh” represents a state of life in which we're bringing bad things on ourselves because we aren't basing our lives on spiritual truths from the Lord's Word.

In Nahum 1:2-6, it's saying that Jehovah appears as an enemy to people who are wanting to stay in evil ways. In the spiritual world, all pretences of innocence or any good thing are stripped away, and our true selfish motives are seen.

In Nahum 1:7, there's a hopeful note; people who turn to the Lord and walk with Him are helped.

But, next there's a warning... in Nahum 1:8-11, that people who stick with their false ideas and evils will perish. It's worth noting that, in New Christian thought, there's the concept that God doesn't condemn us; we end up living in a society that fits our own values. If we're essentially selfish, we'll find a spiritual home in a society of essentially selfish people, and... it's probably pretty grim. It's a form of "perishing".

In Nahum 1:12-14, it's talking about people who are in evil because they don't know any better -- it's evil from ignorance. They can be helped if they listen and repent, and allow their false ideas to be removed (as was described in Jonah 3. That's what is meant by this: “…for I will break his, (Belial’s) brace from off thee and pull apart thy bonds.”

Finally, in Nahum 1:15, there's the beginning of a new theme, which leads into Nahum 2.

   Studovat vnitřní smysl

Exploring the Meaning of Nahum 1      

Napsal(a) Rev. Ian Arnold and Joe David

What's the Book of Nahum about?

We can never really satisfactorily find our way into a book of the Bible, especially a book of the Old Testament, unless we take on board that it's a mirror to us of the inner challenges and experiences we face. Its message, for us, is not about the world outside of us, but about the world inside of us. Beneath the surface, these Bible books focus on this inner world of our thoughts and feelings, burdens and challenges, successes and failures, achievements and disappointments, as we make our journey towards being a more spiritual person.

Most people readily see this "inner meaning" when it comes to the story of Moses leading the ancient people of Israel out of slavery in Egypt to, eventually, the Promised Land. It's movement forward, and movement backward, a longing for what we dream was the past, and more. It speaks to us all.

All of ancient Israel’s enemies symbolize things that attack, plunder, weaken, marginalise and imprison what is from the Lord in our lives. We try to stand up for what's right and decent in a given situation, but in no time, a voice is whispering to us ‘Why bother?’, ‘Who cares?’

Some of those enemies of ancient Israel were fearsome, like the Assyrians and the Babylonians. They were ruthless, rich, powerful and had massive armies.

So think for a moment: what might be amongst the most intimidating ‘enemies’ of our spiritual well-being? What are those things likely to do the most damage?

Babylon has long been recognized as a symbol of power and self-aggrandizement. But what about the Assyrians, who are the antagonists here in the Book of Nahum?

The Assyrians were menacing the ancient Israelites for more than a century, first sweeping away the northern kingdom of Israel in 721 BC, and then hanging around in the area for decades afterwards, a considerable threat to the remaining, southern, kingdom of Judea. How feared and despised they were is so evident in this prophecy of Nahum.

So, in us, what might the Assyrians symbolize? Outside the fortified and walled city of Jerusalem, on one famous occasion they showed themselves to be adept talkers and persuaders. (See the story, in 2 Kings 18).

Hold to this for a moment – “talkers and persuaders”. The thing is that there are those forces and influences that become active within us, trying to talk and persuade us that, for example, sin is fine if it remains undiscovered, or that the Ten Commandments don’t have a place in this day and age, or that 'my lapses are nothing by comparison with what goes on in the world generally'.

If we can see this for what it is, it is pretty fearsome stuff, capable of inflicting great damage to us spiritually.

So, read the Book of Nahum - just 3 chapters of prophecy - with this in mind. It is not people, or tribes, that the Lord pits Himself against - but those very things which hold the potential to devastate us spiritually.

In Chapter 1, “Nineveh” represents a state of life in which we're bringing bad things on ourselves because we aren't basing our lives on spiritual truths from the Lord's Word.

In Nahum 1:2-6, it's saying that Jehovah appears as an enemy to people who are wanting to stay in evil ways. In the spiritual world, all pretences of innocence or any good thing are stripped away, and our true selfish motives are seen.

In Nahum 1:7, there's a hopeful note; people who turn to the Lord and walk with Him are helped.

But, next there's a warning... in Nahum 1:8-11, that people who stick with their false ideas and evils will perish. It's worth noting that, in New Christian thought, there's the concept that God doesn't condemn us; we end up living in a society that fits our own values. If we're essentially selfish, we'll find a spiritual home in a society of essentially selfish people, and... it's probably pretty grim. It's a form of "perishing".

In Nahum 1:12-14, it's talking about people who are in evil because they don't know any better -- it's evil from ignorance. They can be helped if they listen and repent, and allow their false ideas to be removed (as was described in Jonah 3. That's what is meant by this: “…for I will break his, (Belial’s) brace from off thee and pull apart thy bonds.”

Finally, in Nahum 1:15, there's the beginning of a new theme, which leads into Nahum 2.

Swedenborg

Hlavní výklad ze Swedenborgových prací:

der Propheten und der Psalmen Davids 222


Další odkazy Swedenborga k této kapitole:

Die Himmlischen Geheimnisse 2162, 2606, 6435, 7093, 9406, 9553, 10325

Enthüllte Offenbarung 331, 336, 343, 350, 409, 478, 551

Doctrine of the Sacred Scripture 51


Odkazy ze Swedenborgových nevydaných prací:

Apocalypse Explained 36, 69, 400, 405, 411, 414, 419, ...

Coronis oder Anhang zur Wahren Christlichen Religion 34, 58

Scriptural Confirmations 4, 9, 58, 76

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Významy biblických slov

Last
A burden (Jer. 17:4) signifies that which is from the proprium of man.

ninive
'Nineveh' signifies the falsities of doctrinal matters, also the Gentiles, or the falsities originating in the fallacies of the senses, in the obscurity of an...

Buch
(Rev. 10:9.) "And I went unto the angel, saying, give me the little book," signifies the faculty of perceiving the quality of the Word from...

herr
The Lord, in the simplest terms, is love itself expressed as wisdom itself. In philosophic terms, love is the Lord's substance and wisdom is His...

Feinden
An enemy in the Bible refers to people who are in the love of evil and the false thinking that springs from evil. On a...

Weg
'To set a way,' as in Genesis 30:36, signifies being separated.

Meer
Water generally represents what Swedenborg calls “natural truth,” or true concepts about day-to-day matters and physical things. Since all water ultimately flows into the seas,...

trocken
'Withering and drying up,' as in Ezekiel 17:10, referring to the east wind, signifies when there is no good or truth.

karmel
Carmel (Isa. 16:10) signifies the good of the church. Carmel also signifies the celestial church. (Isa. 35:2.)

libanon
'Lebanon' signifies spiritual good. 'Lebanon' signifies the church regarding the perception of truth from the rational self.

Berge
'Hills' signify the good of charity.

zittern
'To tremble,' as in Jeremiah 10:10, relates to the church when falsities are believed and called truths.

Vor
In den meisten Fällen ist die Bedeutung von "vorher" ziemlich einfach, sowohl als eine Art der Beurteilung der relativen Zeit, als auch in der Verwendung...

Hügel
The Writings tell us that the Lord's love is the sun of heaven, and it is natural for us to look above ourselves to the...

wohnen
Many people were nomadic in Biblical times, especially the times of the Old Testament, and lived in tents that could be struck, moved and re-raised...

Zorn
Wut ist eine Emotion, die so häufig bei Menschen vorkommt, dass sie keiner Definition bedarf. Es können jedoch einige interessante Punkte angesprochen werden. 1) Der...

Stehen
'To stand,' and 'come forth' as in Daniel 7:10, refers to truth. In Genesis 24:13, it signifies a state of conjunction of divine truth with...

bleiben
'To stay with,' as in Genesis 32:4, relates to the life of truth when accompanied by good, and in this instance, it means to take...

feuer
Just as natural fire can be both comforting in keeping you warm or scary in burning down your house, so fire in the spiritual sense...

Felsen
'A rock' signifies the Lord regarding the divine truth of the Word.

zeit
"Day" describes a state in which we are turned toward the Lord, and are receiving light (which is truth) and heat (which is a desire...

kennt
Like so many common verbs, the meaning of "know" in the Bible is varied and dependent on context. And in some cases – when it...

feinde
An enemy in the Bible refers to people who are in the love of evil and the false thinking that springs from evil. On a...

finsternis
"Dunkelheit" ist ein Zustand ohne Licht. "Licht" ist die Wahrheit vom Herrn, also stellt "Dunkelheit" einen Zustand dar, in dem es an Wahrheit fehlt. Hier...

spricht
The Lord, in the simplest terms, is love itself expressed as wisdom itself. In philosophic terms, love is the Lord's substance and wisdom is His...

geboten
To command is to give an order that something must be done, and is directed to an individual, or a group. It is an imperative,...

Hause
A "house" is essentially a container - for a person, for a family, for several families or even for a large group with shared interests...

gottes
Der Herr ist die Liebe selbst, ausgedrückt in der Form der Weisheit selbst. Die Liebe ist also sein Wesen, sein Innerstes. Die Weisheit - das...

bilder
'An image' signifies falsities from self-derived intelligence.

Grab
A grave, as in Psalm 88:5, signifies hell. ‘To come forth out of the grave,’ as in John 5:29, signifies to come forth out of...

Füße
Our feet are the lowest and most utilitarian parts of our bodies, and in the Bible they represent the lowest and most utilitarian part of...

juda
City of Judah,' as in Isaiah 40:9, signifies the doctrine of love towards the Lord and love towards our neighbor in its whole extent.

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