Nahum 1

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1 La charge de Ninive, [qui est] le livre de la vision de Nahum Elkosien.

2 Le[Dieu] Fort est jaloux, et l'Eternel est vengeur, l'Eternel est vengeur, et il a la fureur à son commandement; l'Eternel se venge de ses adversaires, et la garde à ses ennemis.

3 L'Eternel est tardif à colère, et grand en force, mais il ne tient nullement le coupable pour innocent; L'Eternel marche parmi les tourbillons et les tempêtes, et les nuées sont la poudre de ses pieds.

4 Il tance la mer, et la fait tarir, et il dessèche tous les fleuves; Basan et Carmel sont rendus languissants, la fleur du Liban est aussi rendue languissante.

5 Les montagnes tremblent à cause de lui, et les coteaux s'écoulent; la terre monte en feu à cause de sa présence, la terre, [dis-je], habitable, et tous ceux qui y habitent.

6 Qui subsistera devant son indignation? et qui demeurera ferme dans l'ardeur de sa colère? Sa fureur se répand comme un feu, et les rochers se brisent devant lui.

7 L'Eternel est bon, il est une forteresse au temps de la détresse, et il connaît ceux qui se confient en lui.

8 Il s'en va passer comme un débordement d'eaux ; il réduira son lieu à néant, et fera que les ténèbres poursuivront ses ennemis.

9 Que pourriez-vous machiner contre l'Eternel? C'est lui qui réduit à néant; la détresse n'y retounera point une seconde fois.

10 Car étant entortillés comme des épines, et ivres selon qu'ils ont accoutumé de s'enivrer, ils seront consumés entièrement comme la paille sèche.

11 De toi est sorti celui qui machine du mal contre l'Eternel, et qui met en avant un méchant conseil.

12 Ainsi a dit l'Eternel : Encore qu'ils soient en paix, et en grand nombre, ils seront certainement retranchés, et on passera outre; or je t'ai affligée, mais je ne t'affligerai plus.

13 Mais maintenant je romprai son joug de dessus toi, et je mettrai en pièces tes liens.

14 Car l'Eternel a donné commission contre toi; il n'en naîtra plus de ton nom; je retrancherai de la maison de tes dieux les images de taille et de fonte; je ferai [de cette maison-là] ton sépulcre, après que tu seras tombé dans le mépris.

15 Voici sur les montagnes les pieds de celui qui apporte de bonnes nouvelles, [et] qui publie la paix! Toi Juda, célèbre tes fêtes solennelles, et rends tes vœux; car les hommes violents ne passeront plus à l'avenir au milieu de toi, ils sont entièrement retranchés.



Exploring the Meaning of Nahum 1      

Napsal(a) Rev. Ian Arnold and Joe David

What's the Book of Nahum about?

We can never really satisfactorily find our way into a book of the Bible, especially a book of the Old Testament, unless we take on board that it's a mirror to us of the inner challenges and experiences we face. Its message, for us, is not about the world outside of us, but about the world inside of us. Beneath the surface, these Bible books focus on this inner world of our thoughts and feelings, burdens and challenges, successes and failures, achievements and disappointments, as we make our journey towards being a more spiritual person.

Most people readily see this "inner meaning" when it comes to the story of Moses leading the ancient people of Israel out of slavery in Egypt to, eventually, the Promised Land. It's movement forward, and movement backward, a longing for what we dream was the past, and more. It speaks to us all.

All of ancient Israel’s enemies symbolize things that attack, plunder, weaken, marginalise and imprison what is from the Lord in our lives. We try to stand up for what's right and decent in a given situation, but in no time, a voice is whispering to us ‘Why bother?’, ‘Who cares?’

Some of those enemies of ancient Israel were fearsome, like the Assyrians and the Babylonians. They were ruthless, rich, powerful and had massive armies.

So think for a moment: what might be amongst the most intimidating ‘enemies’ of our spiritual well-being? What are those things likely to do the most damage?

Babylon has long been recognized as a symbol of power and self-aggrandizement. But what about the Assyrians, who are the antagonists here in the Book of Nahum?

The Assyrians were menacing the ancient Israelites for more than a century, first sweeping away the northern kingdom of Israel in 721 BC, and then hanging around in the area for decades afterwards, a considerable threat to the remaining, southern, kingdom of Judea. How feared and despised they were is so evident in this prophecy of Nahum.

So, in us, what might the Assyrians symbolize? Outside the fortified and walled city of Jerusalem, on one famous occasion they showed themselves to be adept talkers and persuaders. (See the story, in 2 Kings 18).

Hold to this for a moment – “talkers and persuaders”. The thing is that there are those forces and influences that become active within us, trying to talk and persuade us that, for example, sin is fine if it remains undiscovered, or that the Ten Commandments don’t have a place in this day and age, or that 'my lapses are nothing by comparison with what goes on in the world generally'.

If we can see this for what it is, it is pretty fearsome stuff, capable of inflicting great damage to us spiritually.

So, read the Book of Nahum - just 3 chapters of prophecy - with this in mind. It is not people, or tribes, that the Lord pits Himself against - but those very things which hold the potential to devastate us spiritually.

In Chapter 1, “Nineveh” represents a state of life in which we're bringing bad things on ourselves because we aren't basing our lives on spiritual truths from the Lord's Word.

In Nahum 1:2-6, it's saying that Jehovah appears as an enemy to people who are wanting to stay in evil ways. In the spiritual world, all pretences of innocence or any good thing are stripped away, and our true selfish motives are seen.

In Nahum 1:7, there's a hopeful note; people who turn to the Lord and walk with Him are helped.

But, next there's a warning... in Nahum 1:8-11, that people who stick with their false ideas and evils will perish. It's worth noting that, in New Christian thought, there's the concept that God doesn't condemn us; we end up living in a society that fits our own values. If we're essentially selfish, we'll find a spiritual home in a society of essentially selfish people, and... it's probably pretty grim. It's a form of "perishing".

In Nahum 1:12-14, it's talking about people who are in evil because they don't know any better -- it's evil from ignorance. They can be helped if they listen and repent, and allow their false ideas to be removed (as was described in Jonah 3. That's what is meant by this: “…for I will break his, (Belial’s) brace from off thee and pull apart thy bonds.”

Finally, in Nahum 1:15, there's the beginning of a new theme, which leads into Nahum 2.

   Studovat vnitřní smysl

Exploring the Meaning of Nahum 1      

Napsal(a) Rev. Ian Arnold and Joe David

What's the Book of Nahum about?

We can never really satisfactorily find our way into a book of the Bible, especially a book of the Old Testament, unless we take on board that it's a mirror to us of the inner challenges and experiences we face. Its message, for us, is not about the world outside of us, but about the world inside of us. Beneath the surface, these Bible books focus on this inner world of our thoughts and feelings, burdens and challenges, successes and failures, achievements and disappointments, as we make our journey towards being a more spiritual person.

Most people readily see this "inner meaning" when it comes to the story of Moses leading the ancient people of Israel out of slavery in Egypt to, eventually, the Promised Land. It's movement forward, and movement backward, a longing for what we dream was the past, and more. It speaks to us all.

All of ancient Israel’s enemies symbolize things that attack, plunder, weaken, marginalise and imprison what is from the Lord in our lives. We try to stand up for what's right and decent in a given situation, but in no time, a voice is whispering to us ‘Why bother?’, ‘Who cares?’

Some of those enemies of ancient Israel were fearsome, like the Assyrians and the Babylonians. They were ruthless, rich, powerful and had massive armies.

So think for a moment: what might be amongst the most intimidating ‘enemies’ of our spiritual well-being? What are those things likely to do the most damage?

Babylon has long been recognized as a symbol of power and self-aggrandizement. But what about the Assyrians, who are the antagonists here in the Book of Nahum?

The Assyrians were menacing the ancient Israelites for more than a century, first sweeping away the northern kingdom of Israel in 721 BC, and then hanging around in the area for decades afterwards, a considerable threat to the remaining, southern, kingdom of Judea. How feared and despised they were is so evident in this prophecy of Nahum.

So, in us, what might the Assyrians symbolize? Outside the fortified and walled city of Jerusalem, on one famous occasion they showed themselves to be adept talkers and persuaders. (See the story, in 2 Kings 18).

Hold to this for a moment – “talkers and persuaders”. The thing is that there are those forces and influences that become active within us, trying to talk and persuade us that, for example, sin is fine if it remains undiscovered, or that the Ten Commandments don’t have a place in this day and age, or that 'my lapses are nothing by comparison with what goes on in the world generally'.

If we can see this for what it is, it is pretty fearsome stuff, capable of inflicting great damage to us spiritually.

So, read the Book of Nahum - just 3 chapters of prophecy - with this in mind. It is not people, or tribes, that the Lord pits Himself against - but those very things which hold the potential to devastate us spiritually.

In Chapter 1, “Nineveh” represents a state of life in which we're bringing bad things on ourselves because we aren't basing our lives on spiritual truths from the Lord's Word.

In Nahum 1:2-6, it's saying that Jehovah appears as an enemy to people who are wanting to stay in evil ways. In the spiritual world, all pretences of innocence or any good thing are stripped away, and our true selfish motives are seen.

In Nahum 1:7, there's a hopeful note; people who turn to the Lord and walk with Him are helped.

But, next there's a warning... in Nahum 1:8-11, that people who stick with their false ideas and evils will perish. It's worth noting that, in New Christian thought, there's the concept that God doesn't condemn us; we end up living in a society that fits our own values. If we're essentially selfish, we'll find a spiritual home in a society of essentially selfish people, and... it's probably pretty grim. It's a form of "perishing".

In Nahum 1:12-14, it's talking about people who are in evil because they don't know any better -- it's evil from ignorance. They can be helped if they listen and repent, and allow their false ideas to be removed (as was described in Jonah 3. That's what is meant by this: “…for I will break his, (Belial’s) brace from off thee and pull apart thy bonds.”

Finally, in Nahum 1:15, there's the beginning of a new theme, which leads into Nahum 2.

Swedenborg

Hlavní výklad ze Swedenborgových prací:

The Inner Meaning of the Prophets and Psalms 222


Další odkazy Swedenborga k této kapitole:

Arcana Coelestia 2162, 2606, 6435, 7093, 9406, 9553, 10325

L’Apocalypse Révélée 331, 336, 343, 350, 409, 478, 551

La Doctrine de l'Écriture Sainte 51


Odkazy ze Swedenborgových nevydaných prací:

Apocalypse Explained 36, 69, 400, 405, 411, 414, 419, ...

Coronis (An Appendix to True Christian Religion) 34, 58

Scriptural Confirmations 4, 9, 58, 76

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Významy biblických slov

Charge
A burden (Jer. 17:4) signifies that which is from the proprium of man.

Ninive
'Nineveh' signifies the falsities of doctrinal matters, also the Gentiles, or the falsities originating in the fallacies of the senses, in the obscurity of an...

livre
(Rev. 10:9.) "And I went unto the angel, saying, give me the little book," signifies the faculty of perceiving the quality of the Word from...

vision
Vision is the innermost revelation, which is of perception. Visions are according to the state of humankind. The visions of people whose interiors are closed,...

l'eternel
The Lord, in the simplest terms, is love itself expressed as wisdom itself. In philosophic terms, love is the Lord's substance and wisdom is His...

vengeur
'To be avenged seventy and seven fold' denotes damnation.

Fureur
Fury is a receding from good, and anger is a receding from truth.

ennemis
An enemy in the Bible refers to people who are in the love of evil and the false thinking that springs from evil. On a...

colère
La colère est une émotion si commune aux gens qu'elle ne nécessite aucune définition. Cependant, quelques points d'intérêt peuvent être soulevés. 1) Le Seigneur n'est...

pieds
Our feet are the lowest and most utilitarian parts of our bodies, and in the Bible they represent the lowest and most utilitarian part of...

mer
Water generally represents what Swedenborg calls “natural truth,” or true concepts about day-to-day matters and physical things. Since all water ultimately flows into the seas,...

Carmel
Carmel (Isa. 16:10) signifies the good of the church. Carmel also signifies the celestial church. (Isa. 35:2.)

fleur
The budding and fructification of a tree represent the rebirth of man. The growing green from the leaves represents the first state, the blossoming the...

Liban
'Lebanon' signifies spiritual good. 'Lebanon' signifies the church regarding the perception of truth from the rational self.

les montagnes
The Writings tell us that the Lord's love is the sun of heaven, and it is natural for us to look above ourselves to the...

montagnes
'Hills' signify the good of charity.

Terre
Dans la Bible, le terme "Terre" peut désigner une personne ou un groupe de personnes partageant les mêmes idées, comme dans une église. Mais elle...

habitent
Many people were nomadic in Biblical times, especially the times of the Old Testament, and lived in tents that could be struck, moved and re-raised...

Feu
Just as natural fire can be both comforting in keeping you warm or scary in burning down your house, so fire in the spiritual sense...

Passer
'To pass,' as in Genesis 31:52, signifies flowing in. 'To pass the night,' as in Genesis 24:54, signifies having peace. 'To pass through,' as in...

ténèbres
Les "ténèbres" sont un état sans lumière. La "lumière" est la vérité venant du Seigneur, alors l'"obscurité" représente un état où la vérité fait défaut....

mal
'To hurt,' as mentioned in Revelation 6:6, signifies violation and profanation. 'To hurt' as mentioned in Revelation 9:4, signifies perverting the truths and goods of...

dit
As with many common verbs, the meaning of “to say” in the Bible is highly dependent on context. Who is speaking? Who is hearing? What...

Nom
It's easy to see that names are important in the Bible. Jehovah changed Abram and Sarai to Abraham and Sarah, changed Jacob to Israel and...

Maison
A "house" is essentially a container - for a person, for a family, for several families or even for a large group with shared interests...

dieux
Le Seigneur est l'amour lui-même, exprimé sous la forme de la sagesse elle-même. L'amour, donc, est Son essence, Son plus profond. La sagesse - la...

Images
'An image' signifies falsities from self-derived intelligence.

sépulcre
A grave, as in Psalm 88:5, signifies hell. ‘To come forth out of the grave,’ as in John 5:29, signifies to come forth out of...

mépris
We tend to think of "despising" something or someone as just a strong way of expressing dislike, but there is a further shade of meaning...

Juda
City of Judah,' as in Isaiah 40:9, signifies the doctrine of love towards the Lord and love towards our neighbor in its whole extent.

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Why Is God So Angry in the Bible? - Swedenborg & Life Live

The Bible gives us mixed messages about God: all-loving, yet angry. We offer a new perspective on this seeming contradiction.

Nahum 1:2-3 >> 14:28
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