Nahum 1

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1 Tämä on Niniven kuorma, ja Nahumin Elkosilaisen ennustuskirja.

2 Herra on kiivas Jumala ja kostaja, ja Herra on kostaja ja vihainen; Herra on kostaja vihollisiansa vastaan, joka ei vainollisiansa unohda.

3 Herra on pitkämielinen ja suuri voimassa, jonka edessä ei kenkään ole viatoin; Herran tie on tuulessa ja tuulispäässä jonka jalkain tomu pilvi on.

4 Joka nuhtelee merta, ja kuivaa sen, ja tekee kaikki virrat kuivaksi; Basan ja Karmel taipuu, ja se nääntyy mitä Libanonin vuorella kukoistaa.

5 Vuoret vapisevat hänen edessänsä, ja kukkulat sulavat; maa palaa hänen edessänsä, ja maan piiri, ja kaikki, jotka siinä asuvat.

6 Ja kuka seisoo hänen vihansa edessä? eli kuka voi pysyä hänen hirmuisuutensa edessä? hänen vihansa palaa niinkuin tuli, ja kalliot lohkeevat hänen edessänsä.

7 Herra on laupias, ja turva hädän aikana; ja tuntee ne, jotka uskaltavat hänen päällensä.

8 Kuin vedenpaisumus juoksee, niin hän sen lopettaa; mutta hänen vihollisiansa hän vainoo pimeydellä.

9 Mitä te ajattelette Herraa vastaan? Hän on se, joka kuitenkin tekee lopun; ei ahdistus kahdesti tule.

10 Sillä niinkuin orjantappurat, jotka sekaseuraisin kasvavat ja kaikkein tuoreimmat ovat, poltetaan niinkuin kuivat korret;

11 Niin pitää oleman se kavala juoni, joka sinusta tulee ulos, ja pahaa ajattelee Herraa vastaan.

12 Näin sanoo Herra: vaikka he ovat rauhassa, ja heitä on tosin monta, kuitenkin heidän pitää maahan hakatuksi tuleman ja menemän pois; sillä minä olen sinua nöyryyttänyt, mutta en tahdo kuitenkaan enempää vaivata.

13 Vaan tahdon silloin hänen ikeensä sinusta särkeä, ja reväistä rikki sinun sitees.

14 Mutta sinua vastaan on Herra käskenyt, ettei yksikään sinun nimes siemen pysymän pidä. Sinun Jumalas huoneesta tahdon minä hukuttaa sinun epäjumalas, ja kuvas tahdon minä sinulle haudaksi tehdä; sillä sinä olet tyhjäksi tullut.

15 Katso, suloisten saarnaajain jalat ovat vuorilla, niiden jotka rauhaa julistavat; pidä sinun juhlapäiväs, Juuda, ja maksa lupaukses; sillä ei se jumalatoin pidä enään tuleman sinun päälles, joka on kokonaan hävitetty.



Exploring the Meaning of Nahum 1      

Napsal(a) Rev. Ian Arnold and Joe David

What's the Book of Nahum about?

We can never really satisfactorily find our way into a book of the Bible, especially a book of the Old Testament, unless we take on board that it's a mirror to us of the inner challenges and experiences we face. Its message, for us, is not about the world outside of us, but about the world inside of us. Beneath the surface, these Bible books focus on this inner world of our thoughts and feelings, burdens and challenges, successes and failures, achievements and disappointments, as we make our journey towards being a more spiritual person.

Most people readily see this "inner meaning" when it comes to the story of Moses leading the ancient people of Israel out of slavery in Egypt to, eventually, the Promised Land. It's movement forward, and movement backward, a longing for what we dream was the past, and more. It speaks to us all.

All of ancient Israel’s enemies symbolize things that attack, plunder, weaken, marginalise and imprison what is from the Lord in our lives. We try to stand up for what's right and decent in a given situation, but in no time, a voice is whispering to us ‘Why bother?’, ‘Who cares?’

Some of those enemies of ancient Israel were fearsome, like the Assyrians and the Babylonians. They were ruthless, rich, powerful and had massive armies.

So think for a moment: what might be amongst the most intimidating ‘enemies’ of our spiritual well-being? What are those things likely to do the most damage?

Babylon has long been recognized as a symbol of power and self-aggrandizement. But what about the Assyrians, who are the antagonists here in the Book of Nahum?

The Assyrians were menacing the ancient Israelites for more than a century, first sweeping away the northern kingdom of Israel in 721 BC, and then hanging around in the area for decades afterwards, a considerable threat to the remaining, southern, kingdom of Judea. How feared and despised they were is so evident in this prophecy of Nahum.

So, in us, what might the Assyrians symbolize? Outside the fortified and walled city of Jerusalem, on one famous occasion they showed themselves to be adept talkers and persuaders. (See the story, in 2 Kings 18).

Hold to this for a moment – “talkers and persuaders”. The thing is that there are those forces and influences that become active within us, trying to talk and persuade us that, for example, sin is fine if it remains undiscovered, or that the Ten Commandments don’t have a place in this day and age, or that 'my lapses are nothing by comparison with what goes on in the world generally'.

If we can see this for what it is, it is pretty fearsome stuff, capable of inflicting great damage to us spiritually.

So, read the Book of Nahum - just 3 chapters of prophecy - with this in mind. It is not people, or tribes, that the Lord pits Himself against - but those very things which hold the potential to devastate us spiritually.

In Chapter 1, “Nineveh” represents a state of life in which we're bringing bad things on ourselves because we aren't basing our lives on spiritual truths from the Lord's Word.

In Nahum 1:2-6, it's saying that Jehovah appears as an enemy to people who are wanting to stay in evil ways. In the spiritual world, all pretences of innocence or any good thing are stripped away, and our true selfish motives are seen.

In Nahum 1:7, there's a hopeful note; people who turn to the Lord and walk with Him are helped.

But, next there's a warning... in Nahum 1:8-11, that people who stick with their false ideas and evils will perish. It's worth noting that, in New Christian thought, there's the concept that God doesn't condemn us; we end up living in a society that fits our own values. If we're essentially selfish, we'll find a spiritual home in a society of essentially selfish people, and... it's probably pretty grim. It's a form of "perishing".

In Nahum 1:12-14, it's talking about people who are in evil because they don't know any better -- it's evil from ignorance. They can be helped if they listen and repent, and allow their false ideas to be removed (as was described in Jonah 3. That's what is meant by this: “…for I will break his, (Belial’s) brace from off thee and pull apart thy bonds.”

Finally, in Nahum 1:15, there's the beginning of a new theme, which leads into Nahum 2.

   Studovat vnitřní smysl

Exploring the Meaning of Nahum 1      

Napsal(a) Rev. Ian Arnold and Joe David

What's the Book of Nahum about?

We can never really satisfactorily find our way into a book of the Bible, especially a book of the Old Testament, unless we take on board that it's a mirror to us of the inner challenges and experiences we face. Its message, for us, is not about the world outside of us, but about the world inside of us. Beneath the surface, these Bible books focus on this inner world of our thoughts and feelings, burdens and challenges, successes and failures, achievements and disappointments, as we make our journey towards being a more spiritual person.

Most people readily see this "inner meaning" when it comes to the story of Moses leading the ancient people of Israel out of slavery in Egypt to, eventually, the Promised Land. It's movement forward, and movement backward, a longing for what we dream was the past, and more. It speaks to us all.

All of ancient Israel’s enemies symbolize things that attack, plunder, weaken, marginalise and imprison what is from the Lord in our lives. We try to stand up for what's right and decent in a given situation, but in no time, a voice is whispering to us ‘Why bother?’, ‘Who cares?’

Some of those enemies of ancient Israel were fearsome, like the Assyrians and the Babylonians. They were ruthless, rich, powerful and had massive armies.

So think for a moment: what might be amongst the most intimidating ‘enemies’ of our spiritual well-being? What are those things likely to do the most damage?

Babylon has long been recognized as a symbol of power and self-aggrandizement. But what about the Assyrians, who are the antagonists here in the Book of Nahum?

The Assyrians were menacing the ancient Israelites for more than a century, first sweeping away the northern kingdom of Israel in 721 BC, and then hanging around in the area for decades afterwards, a considerable threat to the remaining, southern, kingdom of Judea. How feared and despised they were is so evident in this prophecy of Nahum.

So, in us, what might the Assyrians symbolize? Outside the fortified and walled city of Jerusalem, on one famous occasion they showed themselves to be adept talkers and persuaders. (See the story, in 2 Kings 18).

Hold to this for a moment – “talkers and persuaders”. The thing is that there are those forces and influences that become active within us, trying to talk and persuade us that, for example, sin is fine if it remains undiscovered, or that the Ten Commandments don’t have a place in this day and age, or that 'my lapses are nothing by comparison with what goes on in the world generally'.

If we can see this for what it is, it is pretty fearsome stuff, capable of inflicting great damage to us spiritually.

So, read the Book of Nahum - just 3 chapters of prophecy - with this in mind. It is not people, or tribes, that the Lord pits Himself against - but those very things which hold the potential to devastate us spiritually.

In Chapter 1, “Nineveh” represents a state of life in which we're bringing bad things on ourselves because we aren't basing our lives on spiritual truths from the Lord's Word.

In Nahum 1:2-6, it's saying that Jehovah appears as an enemy to people who are wanting to stay in evil ways. In the spiritual world, all pretences of innocence or any good thing are stripped away, and our true selfish motives are seen.

In Nahum 1:7, there's a hopeful note; people who turn to the Lord and walk with Him are helped.

But, next there's a warning... in Nahum 1:8-11, that people who stick with their false ideas and evils will perish. It's worth noting that, in New Christian thought, there's the concept that God doesn't condemn us; we end up living in a society that fits our own values. If we're essentially selfish, we'll find a spiritual home in a society of essentially selfish people, and... it's probably pretty grim. It's a form of "perishing".

In Nahum 1:12-14, it's talking about people who are in evil because they don't know any better -- it's evil from ignorance. They can be helped if they listen and repent, and allow their false ideas to be removed (as was described in Jonah 3. That's what is meant by this: “…for I will break his, (Belial’s) brace from off thee and pull apart thy bonds.”

Finally, in Nahum 1:15, there's the beginning of a new theme, which leads into Nahum 2.

Swedenborg

Hlavní výklad ze Swedenborgových prací:

The Inner Meaning of the Prophets and Psalms 222


Další odkazy Swedenborga k této kapitole:

Arcana Coelestia 2162, 2606, 6435, 7093, 9406, 9553, 10325

Apocalypse Revealed 331, 336, 343, 350, 409, 478, 551

Doctrine of the Sacred Scripture 51


Odkazy ze Swedenborgových nevydaných prací:

Apocalypse Explained 36, 69, 400, 405, 411, 414, 419, ...

Coronis (An Appendix to True Christian Religion) 34, 58

Scriptural Confirmations 4, 9, 58, 76

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Why Is God So Angry in the Bible? - Swedenborg & Life Live

The Bible gives us mixed messages about God: all-loving, yet angry. We offer a new perspective on this seeming contradiction.

Nahum 1:2-3 >> 14:28
, 14:28

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